News

This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

We welcome your feedback!

Search
Social Networking
Powered by Squarespace

Entries in Blog Awards (3)

Saturday
Apr032010

Saturday Afternoon Visits: April 3

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

It’s been another eventful week around the Kidlitosphere. Here are some links, for your perusal:

NPM_LOGO_2008_final April is National Poetry Month. There are a host of activities going on around the Kidlitosphere in celebration. Happily, Laura Evans of All Things Poetry has compiled a list (which I in turn copied from Finding Wonderland - you can find more details there):

Beautifulbloggeraward1 Lovely_award This week I was honored to receive not one but two blog awards from Dawn Little of Literacy Toolbox. Like my co-honoree Terry Doherty, I’m not one to pass along awards like this - I don’t like picking sub-sets of my favorite blogs, according to anyone else’s criteria. But I am delighted to be in such wonderful company with the other names on Dawn’s list.

I was also happy to have my blog listed as a resource recently on the Education and Social Sciences Library (ESSL) Children’s Literature Blog. Katelyn Edds chose a selection of blogs based on “how often the blogs were updated, their layout and content, and how often the blogs were cited by others as being authoritative.” I’m in excellent company there, too, with blogs like Fuse #8, Readergirlz, and Guys Lit Wire, to name a few.

Speaking of Terry Doherty, her writer’s prompt at Booklights this month is a fun one - Mad Libs. Oh, how I loved Mad Libs when I was in middle school. She talks about some different versions of the Mad Libs idea, shares some memories, and discusses why Mad Libs and related word games are an excellent literacy tool. Fun stuff! Ann also talks about writing prompts for kids in her monthly Booklights post. Great minds thinking alike, I guess.

Dayglo Accredited Online Colleges has a fun post this week: 10 Children’s Books Every Business Student Should read. It’s a nice mix of older and newer titles, and includes Chris Barton’s The Day-Glo Brothers. Thanks to Emma Taylor for the link.

Liz B responds at Tea Cozy to a recent New York Times article by Julie Just about problem parents in young adult literature. I agree 100% with Liz’s conclusion: “Just as parents need to get out of the way for their teenagers to mature into adults, so should we adults who read and review young adult books get out of the way of the intended audience — the teens. Yes, we can read and enjoy those books; but let’s not ask for those books to be written to reflect our reality of adults and parents.” But do read the whole post. Monica Edinger chimes in on the Times piece, too, though more briefly.

At the Book Whisperer, Donalyn Miller continues her series on resources to help teachers discover books for kids. This time, she discusses Twitter (where you can find her at @DonalynBooks). She gives tons of great examples of the fun that is following the kidlit twitterverse.  

MACLogo The NCBLA blog reports on the start of the Exquisite Corpse Adventure Mystery Author Contest. The idea is for school classes to “Play Twenty Questions with other Exquisite Corpse Adventure readers around the country to help identify The Mystery Author! Every class that solves the mystery and emails in the correct guess will be entered into a drawing to win a collection of books valued at over $500 for their classroom or library, plus a phone conversation with The Mystery Author!”

Quick Hits:

  • I haven’t mentioned it in a while, and thought that I would draw your attention to the latest installment of Sherry Early’s Saturday Review of Books at Semicolon. Every week, Sherry asks contributors to link to their reviews from the week - resulting in links to dozens of book reviews.
  • Mitali Perkins shares an inspiring plea from 8th grader Anisha N. on behalf of her school library. 
  • Lenore’s International Book Blogger Mentor program is up and running. She shares some of the featured bloggers at Presenting Lenore.
  • At the Tidy Books blog, Ian Newbold is wondering whether or not children’s books should come with warnings (e.g. if a character dies).
  • Doret wraps up her fun 9 Authors - 12 Baseball Questions series at TheHappyNappyBookseller.
  • If you need more kidlitosphere news, check out the latest FuseNews from Betsy Bird at A Fuse #8 Production. There are also some interesting news links in Joanne Meier’s Food for Thought post at Reading Rockets this week.
  • And finally, Kate Coombs has this week’s Poetry Friday roundup at Book Aunt.

Redsoxlogo I’ll be away from the computer tomorrow, celebrating Easter as well as baseball’s Opening Day (finally!). Wishing you all a Happy Easter or Passover, or anything else that you might celebrate, and a happy spring.

© 2010 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Thursday
Jun252009

Thursday Afternoon Visits: June 25

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Kidlitosphere_buttonHere are a few things from around the Kidlitosphere that caught my eye this week.

BooklightsWe have a new regular blogger over at BooklightsAnn will be posting once a month, offering “an end-of-the-month summary, reaction, and (sharing of) the ideas” that Pam, Susan, and I have raised. You can find Ann’s first post here. She has her top 10 picture books list, and responses to some of the ongoing discussion at Booklights about social reading, summer reading, and the importance of picture books. It’s an honor to have her participation!

Also at Booklights this week: Susan has an informative post about how to find information on series books and sequels, while Pam highlights three extra-cute picture books. And speaking of cute picture books (though not at Booklights, Abby (the) Librarian shares titles from a chicken storytime.

Elaine Magliaro shares Book Lists for Summer Reading 2009 at Wild Rose Reader. In addition to links to various book lists, she also links to two articles from Reading Rockets about getting the most out of summer reading. And for some summer reading suggestions directly from sixth graders, check out “You HAVE to Read This” from Sarah Mulhern’s students at the Reading Zone. “Each student chose one book that they feel all 6th graders must read.” One thing that I love about the list is the range of reading levels of the books included.

Brbc+buttonBook Dads hosts the 20th Edition of the Book Review Blog Carnival (and the first time I’ve run across this carnival, I think). There are quite a few reviews in honor of Father’s Day.

Colleen Mondor has a new installment of her fabulous What a Girl Wants series. This week, she talks with a variety of authors about the allure of the “girl detective” in literature. She asks: “does the girl detective genre matter to teen readers today? Do we need her around and if so, what does she bring to the table? Are we missing out on a chance of future female justices by not having mysteries with teen girl protagonists? In a nutshell, should we care at all about the girl detective?” In addition to the contributions by various authors in the body of the post, there’s a great discussion in the comments, too.

Colleen also links to a post that I neglected to mention before from TheHappyNappyBookseller, about the treatment of an African-American character in the final Percy Jackson book. Doret says: “this final book left a bad taste in my mouth”, and explains why. Jennie from Biblio File expands on the topic of race in the Percy Jackson books with a complaint about the narrator’s treatment of Asian-American characters in the audiobooks.  

CybilsLogoSmallAt the Cybils blog, Sarah Stevenson links to several upcoming and recently released titles written by Cybils panelists. She includes two titles that I recently reviewed (Mare’s War by Tanita Davis and Silksinger by Laini Taylor). Click through to see the others.

At Charlotte’s Library, Charlotte shares a list of fantasy titles compiled for a nine-year-old girl who likes “a bit of scary stuff”. This post is part one of the list, featuring older titles that Charlotte loved at that age. A followup post with more current titles will be forthcoming. There are a bunch of other suggestions from the 1970’s in the comments.

MotherReader shares some suggestions for preventing, and recovering from, the current round of blog angst flu. Here’s a snippet: “Look to the things that make you feel good, or at least feel better. Tap into strong relationships. Find things that make you smile. A sense of humor can be a saving grace. A well-developed sense of irony is better than a good night’s sleep.” She is very wise, that MotherReader.

LemonadestandawardLast, but not least, I received two lovely blog awards this week. First Tif from Tif Talks Books gave me a Lemonade Award, for “blogs that show great attitude or gratitude.” I certainly am grateful to be a member of the Kidlitosphere, so this award means a lot. Thanks, Tif! Susan Stephenson, who was also on Tif’s list, named me a June 2009 Book Chook Hero, with Terry Doherty, for our efforts in putting together the weekly children’s literacy round-ups. We do spend quite a lot of time on those, and it’s extra-nice to have that recognized. A great week all around! Susan also has a lovely post about books and food (reading and eating at the same time) at the Book Chook.

And now, my reader is nearly free of starred items (with the exception of a couple of reviews that I’m saving). It’s time to set aside the computer in favor of dinner. Happy reading, all!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Thursday
Jan222009

Thursday Afternoon Visits: January 22, part 2

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Earlier this afternoon, I started to share some recent news from around the Kidlitosphere. I had to close that post early, before I was able to write about all of my saved items. Here are the rest:

CybilsLogoSmallThere’s an updated Cybils flyer available from the Cybils blog, complete with the new shortlist titles. Sarah Stevenson did an amazing job putting this together. As Sarah explains, we made this double-side flyer “so you can get the latest information out to your nearest libraries, schools, bookstores and eager readers. As always, we thank you all for your help in spreading the word!” You can also find a printable version of the 2008 Cybils shortlists, with blurbs for all of the titles, in the upper right-hand corner of the Cybils blog.

The Horn Book Magazine has a new owner, the parent company that owns the Junior Library Guild. You can find the details here. Link from Read Roger.

Cari from BookScoops recently shared a fun idea. At her daughter’s birthday party, she gave out Curious George books, with bookmarks, for party favors. She found it a positive experience, and urges: “If you have children and plan to do a party give books out as party favors and/or give books to your friends and family for their birthdays. It can’t hurt the publishing industry and over a whole year of giving books that’s got to do something to help. Most important your sharing your love of books and promoting literacy in the people you care about most.”

ButterflyawardTwo people were kind enough to pass along blog awards to me this week. Kate Coombs from Book Aunt gave me a Butterfly Award for being “most helpful”. Book Aunt is a brand new blog that I’ve been reading. I love Kate’s tagline: “Because OTHER people give you clothes and video games for your birthday!” I’ve always been the “book aunt” in my family, so this award resonated with me especially. 

Premiodardosaward-703921As if that wasn’t enough for one week, Margo Dill from Read These Books and Use Them gave me a Premio Dardos award. I love Margo’s reviews, and this was a lovely compliment. I am very fortunate in my blog friends. Thanks Kate and Margo!!

I know I’ve mentioned this before, but don’t miss Kelly Gallagher’s Readicide blog tour. So far he’s been to A Year of ReadingThe Tempered Radical (where it’s been a 4-day conversation, I’m thus not offering direct links), and The Dream Teacher. He’ll also be at The Reading Zone and The Book Whisperer next week. I really am going to have to read this book soon. Sarah from the Reading Zone says that the book is so compelling that she read the whole thing online.

Meg Ivey at the National Center for Family Literacy’s blog offers “a peek at NCFL’s 18th Annual National Conference on Family Literacy (March 1-3, Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort, Florida)!”. Keynote speakers at the conference include Henry WinklerGreg MortensonPeter H. Reynolds, and Lolly WinstonRegistration information is here.  

And finally, Lisa Chellman will be hosting the January Carnival of Children’s Literature at Under the Covers. She has no special theme, but suggested (via email) that “some ideas might be ALA media awards, the Cybils, or any of the other children’s lit awards… winter books… the Inauguration… Martin Luther King Day… or just your favorite post of the month.” Submissions are due January 28th, for the Carnival on the 30th. You can submit posts here.

It feels good to be caught up on the blog news. Hopefully this means that this weekend, I can focus on some reviews. Happy reading!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).