News

This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Entries in Carnival of Children's Literature (9)

Friday
Oct082010

Cybils, Carnival of Children's Literature, and Kidlitcon

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I have three can’t miss pieces of Kidlitosphere news to share today:

Cybils2010small 1. Nominations opened for the 2010 Cybils Awards this morning. Anyone can nominate titles (published from October 16, 2009 to October 15, 2010), one title per person per category. Here is the direct link to the nomination form. From the Cybils blog you can find up-to-the minute lists of nominated titles in each category (for example, Young Adult Fiction is here). Hundreds of titles have already been nominated. You have until October 15th to make sure that your favorites have been included. If you read a children’s or young adult book this year that you think was well-written and chock-full of kid-appeal, nominate it for the Cybils!

2. The September Carnival of Children’s Literature is now available at Great Kid Books. Host Mary Ann Scheuer has assembled a host of links from all around the Kidlitosphere, from news tidbits to book reviews to posts about writing. Mary Ann even took time to include cover images for the reviewed titles - a very nice touch! For fans of children’s literature, this Carnival is not to be missed.

3. The schedule has been announced for Kidlitcon 2010, the fourth annual conference for children’s and young adult book bloggers. Author Maggie Stiefvater is the keynote speaker. I have read and loved all of her books published to date, and am looking forward to meeting her. I’ll be participating in a few of the sessions (more details closer to the conference). But do check out the whole schedule. Kidlitcon has something for everyone involved in children’s book writing and blogging. And it’s not too late to register! As hosts Andrew Karre, Ben Barnhart and Brian Farrey note: “This conference belongs to bloggers and will only be as strong as those who make it happen.” I hope to see you all there!

Great times in children’s and young adult literature land. Wishing you all a book-filled weekend.

© 2010 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Friday
Feb272009

Friday Night Visits: February 27

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

There’s been lot of activity out and about the Kidlitosphere this week. Here are a few highlights:

First up, breaking news from MotherReader — it looks like we have a definite date for the third annual Kidlitosphere conference, “officially, set for the weekend of October 16th–18th at the Sheraton Crystal City Hotel! … As we’ve done in the past, Friday will feature a dinnertime outing to some local place for whomever can come. Saturday will be the conference and dinner. Sunday will be some Washington, DC adventure”. I’ll let you know when the room block is set up, and you can make plans.

Kid-Lit72Lynn Hazen is hosting the February Carnival of Children’s Literature at Imaginary Blog this week. She asked for posts on the theme of “We Love Kid-Lit!”, and the result is a fabulous tribute to the joy of children’s literature. Like Lynn, I especially “enjoyed Book Aunt Kate Coombs’ view on the Anarchy of the Imagination: Why I Love Children’s Books.” But there is lots of other great stuff, too. Don’t miss it!

CybilsLogoSmallDeputy Editor Sarah Stevenson has a final round-up of reviews, and a bit of author feedback from Nic Bishop, at the Cybils blog. Our co-founder Anne Levy also had a fun post earlier in the week of Cybils by the numbers (number of books read, traffic, etc.)

Lots of other award news out this week, too. Gwenda Bond has the nomination lists for the Nebula and Norton awardsLori Calabrese has the scoop on the 2009 Red House Children’s Book AwardsTasha Saecker has the finalists for the 2009 Children’s Choice Book Awards and the 2009 Agatha Awards.   

SassafAnd of course, there’s been lots of buzz this week about the upcoming Share a Story - Shape a Future Literacy Blog Tour. Terry Doherty shares some additional background about the event here. The very thoughtful Brimful Curiosities made a nice button that people can display on their blogs to show support for the event, and I’m seeing it all over the place. You can also join the Share a Story - Shape a Future Facebook group.

Speaking of sharing stories, the Children’s Book Review has coined a new term. “Bookarazzi: A freelance blogger who pursues celebrities who read books, to create posts that promote children’s literature.” I like it!

Interesting Nonfiction for Kids (I.N.K.) shares children’s nonfiction magazinesGretchen Woelfle says “Children’s science magazines have evolved into well-designed, beautifully illustrated journals meant to entertain as well as inform. Animal-loving kids, especially, can revel in the options available.” 

Laurel Snyder’s had a great reaction to an article that she wrote about children’s books for Jews (“Lamenting the predictability of Jewish kids’ lit, a writer takes matters into her own hands”). Liz Burns supports Laurel’s post, but asks “what about the Catholics?” Both articles have generated lots of great discussion about how often authors completely gloss over any religious background of characters in children’s literature.

Gail Gauthier notes “an indication of YA’s significance now”, reporting that “Condoleeza Rice has signed a contract with Crown Publishers to write three books. Two of them will be memoirs about her family—one written for adults and the other “a young adult edition.”” I agree with Gail that a young adult version of the memoir of someone like Rice is good news all around.

BlogbutterflyawardAnd last, but definitely not least, the wonderful team at PaperTigers was kind enough to award me a Butterfly Award, for having a “cool” blog. This is one of my favorite awards, and it’s an honor to receive it from a blog that I link to so often. Thanks, Marjorie!

Wishing you all a joyful and book-filled weekend!

 

 

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Wednesday
Feb112009

Quick Hits: February 11

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I have a few quick news items to share with you this morning.

First up, our own Tanita S. Davis (aka TadMack from Finding Wonderland) is featured today at The Brown Bookshelf. Click through to learn more about Tanita, and her upcoming book. There’s even a rare photo. This interview is part of the Brown Bookshelf’s fabulous 28 Days Later Campaign.

Speaking of campaigns, there are a few new posts out there related to the Campaign for Read-Aloud:

  • The Book Chook interviews The Magnet Lady (aka Jen W). Jen drives around Ann Arbor, MI with a magnet on her car that says “Please read to your kids everyday”. The enthusiasm that both Book Chook and Jen have for reading with kids is inspiring.
  • Reconsidering Read-AloudFranki Sibberson picks up on the reading aloud topic at A Year of Reading, and draws readers’ attention to blog partner Mary Lee Hahn’s book, Reconsidering Read-Aloud (which I agree is an excellent resource). Franki also argues that rather than urging parents simply to read aloud with their kids, “there are LOTS of ways that parents and teachers can support children in becoming lifelong readers (and that) Being part of your child’s reading life is … the critical part.” I agree completely with Franki that read-aloud is only part of the conversation. The real goal is raising kids who enjoy reading, and it makes sense to do whatever it takes to get there. Part of why I like the idea of a campaign for read-aloud is that it’s one concrete thing that people can do to move in that direction.
  • This question was also picked up by Millie Davis at the NCTE Inbox Blog. After discussing her own experience with her daughter, Millie says: “So, would I advocate a national campaign to encourage parents to read aloud to their kids, like Jen Robinson has suggested on her blog? Yes, I think so. Would you?” A number of people discuss this in the comments.

KnuckleheadIn related news, the Providence Journal has an article by Kathleen Odean about National Ambassador Jon Scieszka’s recommendations for encouraging kids to read. The article mentions plenty of specific, kid-friendly titles. Those are fun, but I especially enjoyed this part: “Scieszka was an advocate for reading long before becoming Ambassador and will continue as such after his term ends in December. Meanwhile, he’s enjoying the perks of ambassadorship. “Kids give you things,” he reported, “like royal sashes they’ve decorated with puffy gold paint.”” Fun stuff! Link via Matt Holm.

The previous article mentioned Scieszka’s Guys Read website. Over at The Miss Rumphius Effect, Tricia is fed up with articles that presume that boys don’t like to read (and no, she’s not talking about the Providence Journal article). Citing a Guardian article, she says: “There are some interesting thoughts about “reverse engineering” books to resemble the things readers so love about the web. However, must authors always resort to boy-bashing to do it? Can we please give boys and young men just a bit of credit for their reading habits?” Tricia also linked to a fun Christian Science Monitor article about books for “children of all ages.” It’s also worth clicking through to see Tricia’s lovely new blog format.

Adult fans of children’s books should also check out the February Small Graces auction. Elaine Magliaro has the details at Wild Rose Reader.

In other news, in case you have somehow managed to miss it, Amazon just announced the release of the second edition of the Kindle eBook reader. I first saw the news on The Longstockings, but found a more detailed write-up at Cheryl Rainfield’s. I have to say, as someone who is a huge fan of tradition books, that I am intrigued by this version. It’s so thin! If I was traveling more, I would probably look into it.

Kid-Lit72Last but not least, Lynn Hazen is hosting the February Carnival of Children’s Literature, with a theme of “We Love Children’s (and YA) Books”. She says: “Tell us what you love about reading, reviewing, writing, or illustrating children’s (and YA) books. What do you love about getting good books into the hands of children and youth? What do you love (or even what breaks your heart) about the world of children’s books?” Submissions are due by February 23rd, at the Carnival site.

Wishing everyone a book-filled Valentine’s weekend!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Thursday
Jan222009

Thursday Afternoon Visits: January 22, part 2

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Earlier this afternoon, I started to share some recent news from around the Kidlitosphere. I had to close that post early, before I was able to write about all of my saved items. Here are the rest:

CybilsLogoSmallThere’s an updated Cybils flyer available from the Cybils blog, complete with the new shortlist titles. Sarah Stevenson did an amazing job putting this together. As Sarah explains, we made this double-side flyer “so you can get the latest information out to your nearest libraries, schools, bookstores and eager readers. As always, we thank you all for your help in spreading the word!” You can also find a printable version of the 2008 Cybils shortlists, with blurbs for all of the titles, in the upper right-hand corner of the Cybils blog.

The Horn Book Magazine has a new owner, the parent company that owns the Junior Library Guild. You can find the details here. Link from Read Roger.

Cari from BookScoops recently shared a fun idea. At her daughter’s birthday party, she gave out Curious George books, with bookmarks, for party favors. She found it a positive experience, and urges: “If you have children and plan to do a party give books out as party favors and/or give books to your friends and family for their birthdays. It can’t hurt the publishing industry and over a whole year of giving books that’s got to do something to help. Most important your sharing your love of books and promoting literacy in the people you care about most.”

ButterflyawardTwo people were kind enough to pass along blog awards to me this week. Kate Coombs from Book Aunt gave me a Butterfly Award for being “most helpful”. Book Aunt is a brand new blog that I’ve been reading. I love Kate’s tagline: “Because OTHER people give you clothes and video games for your birthday!” I’ve always been the “book aunt” in my family, so this award resonated with me especially. 

Premiodardosaward-703921As if that wasn’t enough for one week, Margo Dill from Read These Books and Use Them gave me a Premio Dardos award. I love Margo’s reviews, and this was a lovely compliment. I am very fortunate in my blog friends. Thanks Kate and Margo!!

I know I’ve mentioned this before, but don’t miss Kelly Gallagher’s Readicide blog tour. So far he’s been to A Year of ReadingThe Tempered Radical (where it’s been a 4-day conversation, I’m thus not offering direct links), and The Dream Teacher. He’ll also be at The Reading Zone and The Book Whisperer next week. I really am going to have to read this book soon. Sarah from the Reading Zone says that the book is so compelling that she read the whole thing online.

Meg Ivey at the National Center for Family Literacy’s blog offers “a peek at NCFL’s 18th Annual National Conference on Family Literacy (March 1-3, Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort, Florida)!”. Keynote speakers at the conference include Henry WinklerGreg MortensonPeter H. Reynolds, and Lolly WinstonRegistration information is here.  

And finally, Lisa Chellman will be hosting the January Carnival of Children’s Literature at Under the Covers. She has no special theme, but suggested (via email) that “some ideas might be ALA media awards, the Cybils, or any of the other children’s lit awards… winter books… the Inauguration… Martin Luther King Day… or just your favorite post of the month.” Submissions are due January 28th, for the Carnival on the 30th. You can submit posts here.

It feels good to be caught up on the blog news. Hopefully this means that this weekend, I can focus on some reviews. Happy reading!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Tuesday
Dec022008

Quick Hits: December 2

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I have to get to work, but I do have a few quick things to share this morning:

Judy Blume started a blog tour yesterday at Big A little a. I don’t see how my stop on the tour (Thursday) can possibly measure up to Kelly’s post. Or Little Willow’s interview today, for that matter. But I hope that you’ll tune in on Thursday anyway. As I commented at Kelly’s, it’s a bit surreal to be interviewing someone who seemed mythic and unreachable when I was a child. But very cool.

I was honored to be included again in Jon Bard’s Children’s Literature Blog Posts of the day video at Children’s Writing Web Journal (for yesterday’s children’s literacy round-up). Also, for those who subscribe to Children’s Book Insider, don’t miss the guest article from Pam Coughlan (MotherReader). It’s content that Pam has presented at the Kidlitosphere Conferences, about taking your blog to the next level, but it’s always worth another look.

Newlogorg200Big news from Readergirlz. First, they’ll be featuring Meg Cabot this month, and discussing her novel How To Be Popular. [One of the recommended companion reads by the Postergirlz is A la Carte, the lovely first novel by our own Tanita Davis (TadMack from Finding Wonderland). I was also pleased to see Jennifer Ziegler’s How NOT to be Popular as a companion read, because it’s selection pleases my sense of symmetry.]

The other news from Readergirlz is the launch of Readertotz. The email announcement explains: “Co-founded by readergirlz diva and author/illustrator Lorie Ann Grover and author/illustrator Joan Holub, the blog site aims to raise the awareness and esteem of infant-toddler books. Visit the site for a monthly community service, a playlist, a recommended read for the older sibling, and weekly recommends for baby readers.” Very nice!

And finally, don’t forget to submit your favorite/best post of the year (related to children’s literacy or literature) to the December Carnival of Children’s Literature. You can submit by emailing me, or (ideally) use the form at the Carnival website. Please note that posts that have some overt agenda (e.g. religious or commercial), or seem unrelated to the carnival, may be excluded. The deadline to submit is the end of the day on December 15th. So, think about your best or favorite post of the year, or just a post that you would like to see given another look, and send it in. Thanks!

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).