News

This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Entries in Cybils (39)

Sunday
Sep212008

Sunday Afternoon Visits: September 21

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

CybilslogosmallLast week was a bit hectic, between Book Blogger Appreciation Week (the complete list of winners is here) and the announcement of the first Cybils panels (PoetryMiddle Grade FictionFiction Picture Books, and Easy Readers, so far). But I did save up a few other links.

Iloveyourblog_thumb_thumb_2I’m honored to have received this beautiful “I (heart) your blog” award from both Becky of Becky’s Book Reviews and Andrea from Just One More Book!. I’m touched, Andrea and Becky! I love your blogs, too. I’m supposed to nominate seven other blogs, and pass along the award, and tell them each that they’ve been nominated. You all know my position on that — I feel that I show my appreciation for the blogs that I love by linking to them in my visits posts. And yet… this week I feel like I should do more. So, I’d like to go a bit further, and offer this award to the dozen blogs that I added when I first created my blog roll, almost three years ago, and that remain among my favorite sites: Finding WonderlandBartographyRead RogerRead AlertKids LitChicken SpaghettiTea CozyBig A little aWands and WorldsBook MootBook Buds, and What Adrienne Thinks About That. I had pretty good judgment back then, didn’t I? You guys all rock, and I do love your blogs. If you feel so inclined, please do pass along the award to others.

  • This just in, the September Carnival of Children’s Literature is now available at Jenny’s Wonderland of BooksJenny includes quite a few links to reviews of classic children’s books, as well as more modern fare. Jenny and I share a fondness for Alexander Key’s The Forgotten Door, which makes me happy. You can also “Submit your blog article to the next edition of Carnival of Children’s Literature which will be held October 26, 2008 at The Well-Read Child using our carnival submission form.”
  • Speaking of Just One More Book!, Andrea and Mark have started an e-newsletter. The first edition contained: “announcements about (their) upcoming: * Picture Book Pilgrimage, * children’s book and literacy related conference activities, and * exciting autumn guests.” You can sign up here.
  • Two fun posts from Emily at BookKids (the BookPeople Children’s Book blog): Kids Books are for Grown-Ups, Too! and Grown-Up Books to Share with Kids & Teens. Of course I favor the former over the latter - Emily picked some great titles.
  • Congratulations to Susan Beth Pfeffer, whose Life As We Knew It made the NY Times Bestseller List for paperback children’s books for the first time this week. She is very happy. I’m happy, too, because it’s one of my favorite books. 
  • Shrinking Violet Promotions has a reissue of a great post about self-care for introverts. If you missed this one last year, and you think you might be an introvert, you should definitely click through to check this one out. 
  • I missed Talk Like a Pirate Day on Friday. But Sherry from Semicolon and Elizabeth O. Dulemba did not, and they have the scoop. 
  • Elaine Magliaro shares poetry resources about fall at Wild Rose Reader. I especially like how she uses fall colors for highlighting throughout the post.
  • Jenny from Read. Imagine. Talk has a guest post at 5 Minutes for Books this week. She writes aboutchildren’s books based on television shows, and has some surprisingly positive things to say. Also at 5 Minutes for BooksLauren from Baseball and Bows shares a delightful story about her young son’s degree of bookworm-ness.
  • Shannon Hale has a lovely new post in her “how to be a reader” series. This one is about “reviewing the review”, and who, and what, a review is really for. My favorite sentence is “A review can turn the intimate experience of reading into a conversation that enlightens both sides.” I like that idea a lot. Reading is such a solitary experience, usually, but in reviewing a book, we open up avenues for discussion. I like that! 
  • And finally, my heart goes out to Amanda from A Patchwork of Books on the sad news about her son. I don’t know why terrible things happen to good people, I really don’t. But it does kind of put the recent financial news into perspective…

Wishing you all a peaceful week.

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Wednesday
Sep172008

News of the Day

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

So much is going on around the Kidlitosphere this week. Here are a couple of things not to be missed:

KidspicksJennifer Donovan has started a new monthly feature at 5 Minutes for Books: Kids’ Picks carnival. She says that the goal is to “give everyone a chance to share what their children have loved reading that month — whether the child is two or twelve or seventeen…The goal is to just talk children’s books, and specifically what they like (not necessarily what we like or what we want them to like).” More than a dozen people have participated so far, and it’s a nice window into the books that kids enjoy. I am really liking the 5 Minutes for Books blog.

Bookbloggerbutton2There is another fun contest at My Friend Amy for BBAW. Complete the sentence “You know you’re a book addict when…” Sadly, I think that the official contest is over, but some of the entries are tremendously entertaining.

KidlitlogoThe preliminary schedule is up for theKidlitosphere Conference in Portland. It’s going to be a great time! The last day to register is next Tuesday, the 23rd.

CybilslogosmallAnd last, but definitely not least, the next set of panelists for the Cybils has been announced: Fiction Picture Books, headed by the ever-capable and fun MotherReader. And don’t miss the organizer profiles for Anastasia Suen (Easy Readers) and Kelly Fineman (Poetry).

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Monday
Sep152008

Pirates, Cybils, and BBAW Ahoy

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I did a couple of pretty comprehensive Sunday Visits and Literacy Round-Up posts yesterday. But a few things came up today that I simply must mention:

  • CybilslogosmallThe 2008 Cybils panelists will be announced over the next couple of weeks, starting tomorrow. Stay tuned! And isn’t the new logo pretty?
  • Becky from Becky’s Book Reviews reminds readers about her Google reading groupReading with Becky. There are 20 or so members, and the group is currently reading The Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Bookbloggerbutton2Book Blogger Appreciation Week has officially started at My Friend Amy. In the first daily raffle (today) you can win books and chocolate. Comment on this linked post for an extra raffle entry. And in general, stay tuned at My Friend Amy. There’s a ton of interesting stuff going on. Amy is encouraging people to highlight, on their own blogs, the blogs that they love that weren’t short-listed for awards. I’ll say (again), check out my Sunday Visits posts. All of the blogs that I mention deserve to be noticed.
  • Terry has another great installment of her Reading Round-Up at The Reading Tub’s blog. Of particular note: “Tonight on PBS Judy Woodruff hosts Where We Stand: America’s Schools in the 21st Century. The show airs at 10:00 PM.” Reading Today Daily has a link to the trailer.
  • Librarina reports that September 19th is International Talk Like a Pirate Day. I can’t say that I do a lot to celebrate this day, but I’m glad that it exists. The website is quite fun, too.
  • The Readergirlz reported on their MySpace page that Libba Bray has had to postpone being their featured author for October (she was called away to a book tour in Germany and Italy - the author’s life is rough sometimes). But they have an amazing replacement in Rachel Cohn. As Readergirlz Diva Lorie Ann Grover said: “The very month her and David Levithan’s bookNick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist launches onto the big screen, she’s going to be talking with you each at the group forum. WOOT!”

Hope that everyone has a great week! I’ll be back tomorrow with more Cybils news.

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Friday
Aug292008

Friday Afternoon Visits: Labor Day Weekend Edition

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I was away for much of this past week, attending to a (now under control) parental health crisis. This weekend I have guests coming in from out of town, and I doubt I’ll get much blogging in. But I managed to scrape up a bit of time to share some links with you this afternoon. There has been, and will be, a lot going on in the Kidlitosphere.

  • First up, the official call has been made for 2008 Cybils judges. If you actively blog about children’s and/or young adult books and you’re interested in participating, check out the detailed requirements and responsibilities on the new and improved Cybils blog. This year there will be a new category, Easy Readers, headed by the terrifically qualified Anastasia Suen. More details, and a call for judges, can be found here. I’m hoping to be involved in the easy reader category this year, too. I think that finding quality books for the very earliest readers is an important task (as does Gail Gauthier).
  • September 15-19 is Book Blogger Appreciation Week, hosted at the blog My Friend AmyAmy says: “Acknowledging the hard work of book bloggers and their growing impact on book marketing and their essential contribution to book buzz in general, I am excited to announce the first Book Blogger Appreciation Week. Think of it as a retreat for book bloggers and a chance for us to totally nerd out over books together. And of course, shower each other with love and appreciation.” The categories are listed here, and do include Best Kidlit Blog and Best Young Adult Lit Blog, among many others. Nominations are made by email, and you can nominate up to two blogs per category. You do not need to have a blog to nominate, and although there’s a concept of registering, I don’t think that you have to register to be included in the nomination process. Anyway, there has been lots of buzz about this, so if you are interested, check out the nomination post.
  • Linda Salzman reminds I.N.K. (Interesting Nonfiction for Kids) readers that there is only one week left to enter the I.N.K. “Spectacular Fifteen Book Blast Give-away.” The contest is open to “teachers, librarians, homeschoolers, writers, or anyone else from across the country who is promoting nonfiction.”
  • Over at Books Together, Anamaria shares news about the new Ballet Shoes movie (based on the Noel Streatfeild book). I thought that Ballet Shoes was magical when I was a kid. Though I enjoyed several of the other books, Ballet Shoes was always special. I look forward to seeing the movie, which co-stars Emma Watson
  • At BookMoot, Camille shares some thoughts for school librarians as the school year begins. She shares some aspirations, and says: “I salute the librarians who work so hard to teach important research skills, stoke young people’s imaginations and instill a love of books and reading in their students. Your joy and passion for your job is contagious.” I will never forget my elementary school librarian, Mrs. Betty Tuttle, who made a difference in my life, and in my reading. Here’s to all of the other Mrs. Tuttles out there. You do make a difference.
  • Also in back-to-school land, Elaine Magliaro shares links to back to school picture books and poetry at Wild Rose Reader. And at The Miss Rumphius Effect, Tricia has some suggestions for teachers to improve communication with both parents and students.
  • In a post called Girl Books, Boy BooksJustine Larbalestier writes about the tendency that many women have to read mostly books by women, and men to read books by men. She concludes: “Women are far more mixed in their reading. Even me. I read way more books by women than by men, but I’ve still read a tonne of boy books. Some of there are even quite good. I’d even recommend them to my little sister. Maybe … What about youse lot? Do you notice a tendency one way or the other in your own reading? Do you have idea why? Or do you just read the books that look cool.” As is often the case with Justine’s posts, this one has sparked quite a bit of discussion.
  • On the ALSC Blog, Kiera Parrott shares suggestions for conducting storytimes for autistic children. After giving several concrete suggestions, she notes: “Without a doubt, storytimes with autistic students have been some of the most rewarding programs in my career so far.  The kids are smart, surprising, and each time I see them, I learn something new.”
  • At Librarilly Blonde (which is rapidly becoming one of my favorite blogs), Carlie Webber shares thoughts about methods of teaching young adult literature which rely on analysis, and take away the joy of reading. Carlie was inspired by a Washington Post article by Nancy Schnog about teaching YA literature. Among other things, Schnog says: “As much as I hate to admit it, all too often it’s English teachers like me — as able and well-intentioned as we may be — who close down teen interest in reading.” What a sad commentary that is. But there’s clearly some truth to it. Schnog also says, late in the article (after presenting evidence to support her thesis): “The lesson couldn’t be clearer. Until we do a better job of introducing contemporary culture into our reading lists, matching books to readers and getting our students to buy in to the whole process, literature teachers will continue to fuel the reading crisis.” And there you have it, folks. Be sure to read Carlie’s thoughts, too, as well as those of Terry from the Reading TubColleen Mondor from Chasing RayTricia from the Miss Rumphius Effect, and Libby from Lessons from the Tortoise.
  • And on the subject of people trying to make books interesting and relevant for young adults, Laurie Halse Anderson has extended the deadline for her book trailer contest (for Speak or Twisted). The contest is only available to “people who will be 21 years old or younger on October 31, 2008.” And I especially love rule #6: “Contest is open to anyone on the Planet Earth. Teens working aboard the space station are welcome too. Entries from other planets and galaxies will be considered, as long as they can be watched on Earth-created technologies.” If you know any creative teens, I would definitely recommend sending them in Laurie’s direction.
  • School Library Journal has a nice article by Michael Sullivan about boys and reading. He starts out with “If we want to transform boys into lifelong readers, we need to discover what makes them tick. Equally important, we need to have a better grasp of the kind of reading that attracts them.” He concludes (after a number of concrete suggestions and examples): “Although boys often do not become successful readers, the cost is too high to allow this trend to continue. It’s time to give boys more options, to respect their preferences. Boys can become readers: I’ve seen it with my own eyes.”
  • At Five Minutes for Books, Lauren writes about reading for story (“Not for the character development and interaction. Not because of the descriptive, emotive powers of the writer. Not because of deep, literary meaning hidden beneath layers of metaphor… (but) because you want to know what happens next”). Personally, I’ve always been all about story. I’ll appreciate a book more if it’s well-written, of course, with complex characters, fully realized setting, and lyrical writing. But if it doesn’t have that “what happens next” sense of story (whether the book is fiction or non), I won’t read it at all. Of course this isn’t true for everyone, but it does seem to be true for most of Lauren’s commenters.
  • This week’s Poetry Friday round-up is at Charlotte’s Library.
  • At Bookshelves of Doom, Leila shares her off the cuff list of 20 essential picks for YA. She has some of my favorites on her list (though others are not - clearly this is a very personal thing). But if you’re looking for some good suggestions from someone who really appreciates young adult fiction, you should definitely check out Leila’s list (though she added in the comments below “please do note that that list was totally off the top of my head! There wasn’t a whole lot of thought involved — I was just musing about what I might put on a list like that…”). There are other suggestions in the comments, too.
  • At Library Stew, Kathy has a post for parents on how to find a good book. Among other down-to-earth advice, she says: “Students are more likely to enjoy reading when they are reading about something that interests them.The best thing in choosing books for you students is to have them be part of the process, take them to the bookstore or library and have them tell you what they are interested in reading.” 
  • Rick Riordan is going to be on the Today Show on September 8th, talking about the launch of the 39 Clues series. I’ve set this to record on my DVR (not even for Rick will I get up at 7:00 to watch television, on what will already be tape-delay here in California). But I am interested to watch the segment. 
  • At Tea Cozy, Liz B. brings her customary insight to a Washington Post article by Bob Thompson (and a snarky Booksl** comment) about the business side of graphic novels. Liz says that the Post article is a must-read because “It talks about things like distribution and how comic book sales are different from book sales. Unless you’re content to not publish your work, or have a trust fund or well-off spouse, or don’t care about things like insurance and paying rent, it is important to remember that publishing (including comic books and graphic novels) is a business.” I also liked the way that she pointed out that although the idea that graphic novels are big isn’t exactly news to the KidLit blogger community, it IS news to many members of the Washington Post’s audience.

And that is quite enough for one day. Wishing you all a lovely Labor Day Weekend.

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

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