News

This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Entries in Kelly Gallagher (3)

Wednesday
Jan282009

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: January 28

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I’ve received many comments on my recent blog post about encouraging more people to read aloud to kids. Many thanks to everyone who has participated in that discussion, and to the people who posted about it on their own blogs (herehereherehereherehereherehereherehere, and here, for instance). I think there’s a tremendous collective energy to at work here, and I find this heartening.

There are lots of other things going on around the Kidlitosphere, too, however. Here are a few quick highlights: 

Becky from Becky’s Book Reviews reports that the ALA’s Best Books for Young Adults (BBYA) list, and top 10 list, have been posted. Also newly available are the ALA Notables list for younger readers, and the 2009 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers. These are great lists - a bit more broad than the Printz list, and filled with excellent suggestions.

Graveyard BookSpeaking of the ALA Awards, Just One More Book! scored a real coup yesterday. They interviewed brand-new Newbery winner Neil Gaiman. It’s more comprehensive than the Today Show interview, that’s for sure. Well worth listening to.

And speaking of interviews, Natasha over at Maw Books recently interviewed our own Becky from Becky’s Book Reviews. Here’s the part that made me envious. Asked what she does for work, Becky said: “My work is all play. I don’t have a paying job. I just blog full-time. Which is probably why I’m able to maintain three blogs.” How cool is that? But seriously, this is what enables Becky to share so many wonderful book reviews, and I’m happy for her. Thanks for a great interview, Natasha!

I’m a bit late with this, but Lee Wind reports that this is No Name Calling Week, “a week of educational activities aimed at stopping name-calling and verbal bullying in schools.”

Jennifer Donovan at 5 Minutes for Books has a nice post about encouraging tweens to enjoy reading, so that they’ll become lifelong readers. She says, in reference to hear 10-year-old daughter, “Like me, reading is first in her heart, but other interests can easily crowd it out. What trumps things like friends, TV and other hobbies? A good book will do it every time.” Her conclusion (after some specific discussion) is that “It’s the combination of time set aside for reading and getting the right books in her hands that keep her reading.”

I also enjoyed this post by Susan Stephenson at The Book Chook, about the need for finding kid-friendly children’s books. She says: “If we want our kids to enjoy reading, we need to give them access to material they want to read. Checking a book to see if it has won a literary prize is probably not the best way to filter books. Rather, let your child choose, and make sure she has plenty of books to choose from.” She concludes: “And the very best thing about books? They stay our friends for life.” I agree, and am pretty sure I’ve used that exact wording myself.

ReadicideDonalyn Miller has the latest installment in Kelly Gallagher’s Readicide blog tour at The Book Whisperer. I especially like Gallagher’s statement that: “If you teach students to read and write well, they will do fine on exams.” Seems logical to me.

And finally, Don Tate recently passed along a call to action in light of the “well-intentioned but terribly written law (that) could very well put an end to independent publishing, result in thousands if not millions of books being pulled off store and library shelves across the country, and leave our culture with much less diversity in books for our kids.” I really hope that Congress can fix the CPSIA law in time to avoid this crisis.

That’s all for today. Thanks for reading!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Thursday
Jan222009

Thursday Afternoon Visits: January 22, part 2

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Earlier this afternoon, I started to share some recent news from around the Kidlitosphere. I had to close that post early, before I was able to write about all of my saved items. Here are the rest:

CybilsLogoSmallThere’s an updated Cybils flyer available from the Cybils blog, complete with the new shortlist titles. Sarah Stevenson did an amazing job putting this together. As Sarah explains, we made this double-side flyer “so you can get the latest information out to your nearest libraries, schools, bookstores and eager readers. As always, we thank you all for your help in spreading the word!” You can also find a printable version of the 2008 Cybils shortlists, with blurbs for all of the titles, in the upper right-hand corner of the Cybils blog.

The Horn Book Magazine has a new owner, the parent company that owns the Junior Library Guild. You can find the details here. Link from Read Roger.

Cari from BookScoops recently shared a fun idea. At her daughter’s birthday party, she gave out Curious George books, with bookmarks, for party favors. She found it a positive experience, and urges: “If you have children and plan to do a party give books out as party favors and/or give books to your friends and family for their birthdays. It can’t hurt the publishing industry and over a whole year of giving books that’s got to do something to help. Most important your sharing your love of books and promoting literacy in the people you care about most.”

ButterflyawardTwo people were kind enough to pass along blog awards to me this week. Kate Coombs from Book Aunt gave me a Butterfly Award for being “most helpful”. Book Aunt is a brand new blog that I’ve been reading. I love Kate’s tagline: “Because OTHER people give you clothes and video games for your birthday!” I’ve always been the “book aunt” in my family, so this award resonated with me especially. 

Premiodardosaward-703921As if that wasn’t enough for one week, Margo Dill from Read These Books and Use Them gave me a Premio Dardos award. I love Margo’s reviews, and this was a lovely compliment. I am very fortunate in my blog friends. Thanks Kate and Margo!!

I know I’ve mentioned this before, but don’t miss Kelly Gallagher’s Readicide blog tour. So far he’s been to A Year of ReadingThe Tempered Radical (where it’s been a 4-day conversation, I’m thus not offering direct links), and The Dream Teacher. He’ll also be at The Reading Zone and The Book Whisperer next week. I really am going to have to read this book soon. Sarah from the Reading Zone says that the book is so compelling that she read the whole thing online.

Meg Ivey at the National Center for Family Literacy’s blog offers “a peek at NCFL’s 18th Annual National Conference on Family Literacy (March 1-3, Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort, Florida)!”. Keynote speakers at the conference include Henry WinklerGreg MortensonPeter H. Reynolds, and Lolly WinstonRegistration information is here.  

And finally, Lisa Chellman will be hosting the January Carnival of Children’s Literature at Under the Covers. She has no special theme, but suggested (via email) that “some ideas might be ALA media awards, the Cybils, or any of the other children’s lit awards… winter books… the Inauguration… Martin Luther King Day… or just your favorite post of the month.” Submissions are due January 28th, for the Carnival on the 30th. You can submit posts here.

It feels good to be caught up on the blog news. Hopefully this means that this weekend, I can focus on some reviews. Happy reading!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Saturday
Jan172009

Saturday Afternoon Visits: January 17

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Here is some recent news from around the children’s and young adult book blogs, for your long weekend reading. I’ll be back sometime Monday night with more focused children’s literacy and reading news.  

Secret KeeperThere’s nothing like a good book party. On Thursday I attended a book launch party for Mitali Perkins’ Secret Keeper at Not Your Mother’s Book Club. I didn’t get any pictures, but I did get a signed copy of the book, and a couple of excellent samosas. It was great to see Mitali again. I also met some new people (both friends of Mitali’s and friends of YA books), and got to chat with Sharon LevinSusan Taylor Brown (see Susan’s write-up about the party), Lynn HazenJim AverbeckEmily Jiang, and Becky Levine. Fun stuff. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to make Justina Chen Headley’s upcoming book party for North of Beautiful, because it’s up in Bellevue, Washington (and I have guests coming that weekend). But if you’re in the neighborhood, it’s on February 1st, and sure to be a fun time.

Via Read Roger, the new Notes from the Horn Book is now available. Notes is a lovely little email newsletter about “good books for children and teens”. I recommend it. The Horn Book also has a new monthly book list from Claire, this one, fittingly, about American Presidents.

Newbery-winning author Susan Patron has an opinion piece defending the Newbery Award in last Sunday’s LA Times. I first saw the link at Educating AliceMonica Edinger’s blog. Franki Sibberson also has a nice reaction to the Newbery-related discussions at A Year of Reading, complete with a defense of prior winner Kira-Kira. See also Denise Johnson’s Newbery News round-up at The Joy of Children’s Literature, and Betsy Bird’s Newbery & Caldecott Predict-o-rama at A Fuse #8 Production.

In other book award news, Tasha Saecker has the shortlists for the 2009 Edgar Awards in juvenile and young adult fiction at Kids Lit. She is always up on the book award news. I was glad to see Eleven, by Patricia Reilly Giff, on the list. It was one of my favorites last year.

Speaking of awards, another blog award has been making the rounds. The Prémio Dardos (“Best Blog Dart Thinker”) Award “acknowledges the values that every blogger shows in their effort to transmit cultural, ethical, literary, and personal values every day.” Aerin from In Search of Giants and Pam Coughlan from MotherReader were both kind enough to grant me this award. I’m grateful to have them as my friends. But I’m also going to take Lee Wind’s example and “instead of passing on any more Prize Darts, remind everyone to check out the blogrolls on the blogs you read - That, in my opinion, is the real Prize Cache!” 

ReadicideSarah from The Reading Zone is encouraging people to take advantage of the opportunity to download a free copy of Kelly Gallagher’s new book, Readicide: How Schools are Killing Reading and What You Can Do About It. Sarah, along with several other fabulous, reading-focused blogs, will be participating in Kelly’s blog tour this coming week. It sounds like an amazing book, though (not being much of a 21st Century Reader), I’m likely to wait to read it until I can read more comfortably in print. See also Donalyn Miller’s response to the book at The Book Whisperer, Mary Lee and Franki’s response to the book at A Year of Reading. And don’t miss Franki’s new blog visits feature, in which she’ll be giving us a window into her 21st Century Literacy Thinking: “posting about my current thinking and linking to some great posts that helped my thinking each week— or whenever I seem to be finding lots of good stuff around the topic.”

Finally, four fun quick hits: First, Donalyn Miler emailed me that “January 27th is the 5th annual Rabbit Hole Day in honor of Lewis Carroll’s birthday”. The original link is from Boing Boing. Second, Longstocking Daphne Grab had a heart-warming experience at a recent middle school visits, when the students rose up in defense of writing for kids. Great stuff! Third, congratulations to our own Little Willow, who has just opened in a world premiere musicalPope Joan. Fourth, Farida Dowler has a nice post about the five laws of storytelling, with extensive comments.

Happy MLK/inuguration weekend!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).