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This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Entries in KidLitCon (49)

Thursday
Apr012010

The 2010 Kidlit Conference

(this is a reposting from the 2010 main page for KidLitCon. There’s great info here that we don’t want lost, even as we start posting info for the 2011+ conferences)

 

Greetings, YA and KidLit Blogdom!

Welcome to the first informational post for the Kidlitosphere 2010 Conference!

This year’s conference will be hosted by Andrew Karre (Carolrhoda), Ben Barnhart (Milkweed Editions) and Brian Farrey (Flux) in beautiful downtown Minneapolis.

Let’s start with the basics:

Where: Open Book, Minneapolis, MN
When: Saturday, October 23, 2010

 

The rough schedule calls for a wine and cheese reception on the night of Friday the 22nd, a day of workshops and panels on the 23rd, followed by a closing conference dinner in the evening.

We’re still working out the details of cost for the conference and hotel; we hope to have all the particulars very soon. Our goal is to make the cost comparable to past conferences. Once we’ve finished getting bids, we’ll post registration information. But if you send an e-mail right now to kidlitcon2010@gmail.com with the subject line “Intent to Register,” you will receive $5.00 off the cost of registration.

We are now accepting proposals for workshops and panel discussions. We’re looking for a range of topics aimed at both beginning and experienced bloggers. While we’ll consider all submissions and ideas, we are most interested in seeing sessions that address:

  • Issues of diversity in reviewing/blogging
  • Effective marketing/networking
  • Ethics of book reviews
  • Beyond the blog (vlogs, etc.)

Remember: this is your conference! If there is a topic that you’d like to see addressed but don’t feel you’re able to present on, please shoot us an e-mail at kitlitcon2010@gmail.com with your suggestion. Later on, we’ll list the topics that people would like to see covered and solicit proposals based on the requested list.

 

Please download and fill out the submission proposal form, then e-mail it back to us at the above address. Deadline for submissions is August 1, 2010. Our goal is to reply to all submissions by mid to late August.

Follow us on Twitter here: twitter.com/kidlitcon2010

And here’s the Facebook page: www.facebook.com/pages/Kidlitcon-2010/137299689614524

Please note that the KidLitCon 2010 blog will be your best source for up to date information.

Lots more info to come in the next few weeks. (We’re working on a few fun surprises…) For now, start spreading the word! Be a fan on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Let people know when the conference is and to start their plans to attend/present/support!

See photos from the KidLitosphere Conference

See more information about KidLitosphere Conference 2009

Visit the KidLitosphere Conference 2008 site

Visit the KidLitosphere Conference 2008 CafePress store

Saturday
Oct242009

Sunday Afternoon Visits: October 25

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

It took a bit of doing, after traveling for five days last week, but I am finally caught up again with the blogs in my reader. Here are some highlights.

KidLitCon-badgePam is rounding up KidLitCon writeups at MotherReader. If you have a post about the conference that’s not included, leave the link in the comments at MotherReader, and Pam or Bill will get it added to the list. I’ve been hearing feedback on my conference post that people who didn’t attend are finding the various writeups useful, which is good to hear.

Cybils2009-150pxCybils nominations are now closed, and nominating committee panelists are reading and reviewing away. Approximately 950 titles were nominated across the nine categories. Sheila Ruth is contacting publishers about review copies, and shares details at the Cybils blog.

Tuesday was the National Day of Writing. I was digging out of email after last weekend’s trip, and pretty much missed the festivities. But I did manage to submit an entry to Mary Lee and Franki’s Gallery of Writing: A Lifetime of Reading. You can even see me on a short video that Mary Lee made about the gallery at A Year of Reading (at least, I think you can - I never have the nerve to actually watch myself on video). I especially loved Melissa’s submission, childhood and a love of reading, which you can find at Book Nut. Melissa describes how she rediscovered the power of children’s literature as an adult, and never looked back. Of course I agree with her completely that “some of the best stories out there are being written for children and young adults”.

Deweys-readathonbuttonThis weekend many book bloggers are participating in Dewey’s 24-Hour Readathon. Here’s a brief description from the Readathon website: “For 24 hours, we read books, post to our blogs about our reading, and visit other readers’ blogs. We also participate in mini-challenges throughout the day. It happens twice a year, in April and in October.” There are about 140 bloggers participating (some from the Kidlitosphere, others from the broader book blogging community).

CrocusThe blog Saffron Tree is hosting a “book festival called CROCUS, for a week, starting yesterday, Oct 23rd, 2009. The theme is “Around the world in 7 days” and true to this, there will be an avalanche of reviews of wonderful books focusing on folktales, immigrant tales, modern tales, a crossword contest, and some interesting author interviews. This is all in the spirit of the blog to promote reading to children, and more so, of culturally diverse books.” (Text from an email that I received about the event.)

Quick hits:

  • At Kiddosphere, Jennifer Schultz has a feature in honor of Children’s Magazine Month. Jennifer also shares her thoughts on children’s books that would make great movies.
  • Episode 3 of The Exquisite Corpse Adventure is now available. This installment was contributed by Kate DiCamillo and illustrated by Calef Brown.
  • The most recent Poetry Friday roundup is at Big A little a. The most recent Nonfiction Monday roundup is at Lori Calabrese Writes!.  
  • Cheryl Rainfield shares part 6 of her occasional series on gift ideas for book loves, writers, and editors.
  • Lee Wind suggests that anonymity regarding book covers is a plus of eBook readers for boys reading books that might be considered “girly”, and for boys and girls reading GLBTQ titles.
  • At Educating AliceMonica Edinger discusses the question of whether or not a picture book could receive the Newbery Award (inspired by a post at Heavy Medal).
  • Tristan Bancks has a nice little post about the power of time off. He notes: “Creative work starts to feel samey when you work too hard for too long. You forget why you love it”, and recommends getting away from time to time.
  • James Preller (author of Six Innings) has a powerful memorial post about a boy named Ben.
  • Angie has a thoughtful post at Angieville about “those unexpected moments that give you pause, the passages, the words, the emotions they evoke. These are the passages that become favorites, that you go back and re-read to savor.”
  • Also, following up on her bad boys piece from last month, Angie has a post about nice guys from stories. She starts with the prototypical nice guy from literature, Gilbert Blythe (noting “capable of a little wickedness” as a requirement for the list).
  • GreenBeanTeenQueen shares her favorite sick day books and movies. Anne Shirley features prominently. Some of my favorite comfort reads are by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Georgette Heyer, Jane Austen, and D. E. Stevenson. What about you?
  • At Tea Cozy, Liz B profiles Semicolon’s Saturday Review of Books feature.
  • Travis has an entertaining, tongue-in-cheek post at 100 Scope Notes about “things librarians fancy”.
  • And, for a final fun post, the NCBLA blog links to an online contest at the New Yorker by which people can submit photos of their pets dressed up as literary characters (for instance, long-suffering dog Poppy dressed as The Velveteen Rabbit).

That’s all for today. Wishing you all a peaceful weekend.

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Wednesday
Oct142009

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: October 14

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

First up, congratulations to the Kidlitosphere’s own Laini Taylor, shortlisted for the 2009 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature (for Lips Touch, which was already on my “must read soon” stack). I have raved about Laini’s other two books, Blackbringer and Silksinger, and heard great things about Lips Touch, too. Laini is a fabulous writer, and this is much deserved. Not to mention that Laini was a Cybils panelist last year, and co-organizer of the second Kidlitosphere Conference in Portland (with Jone MacCulloch). And she’s growing a young bookworm, even as we speak. Oh, I am just so happy for Laini!! {Edited to add: here’s Laini’s response.} Congratulations to the other nominees, too. Especially Deborah Heiligman (author of Charles and Emma), who I haven’t met, but who is my Facebook friend. See the full young people’s list at the Cybils blog.

Cybils2009-150pxCybils nominations close at midnight tomorrow night (10/15). You can access the nomination form, and lists of all of the nominated titles in each category, here. So, if you have a title that you LOVE, that you think is well-written and kid-friendly, the kind of book that you want to shout from the rooftops about, and it hasn’t been nominated yet, don’t miss your chance to see it considered for the Cybils. You can also read a bio/manifesto for Cybils co-founder Anne Boles Levy here.

KidLitCon-badgeKidLitCon is also fast approaching. Sara Lewis Holmes and her blogging author co-panelists are looking for your input. Sara asks: “What would you like to know about blogging as an author? Do you have questions about how we decide what to blog about/how we got started/why we continue/what benefits we see/what the pitfalls are? Or any other question?” See also Pam’s most recent post, encouraging locals who haven’t signed up yet to give the conference a look.

Susanna Reich wrote to me from I.N.K., saying: “Twenty-two award-winning authors who’ve been blogging at INK: Interesting Nonfiction for Kids, have created a searchable  database, INK Think Tank: Nonfiction In Your Classroom, at www.inkthinktank.com. Visitors will be able to search by keyword, subject, author, title, grade level, and most significantly, by national curriculum standards. Our goal is to get trade books into the classroom, and initial response from teachers and librarians has been enthusiastic.”

Becky Levine has an inspirational post about re-opening doors that you might have closed earlier in your life. She says: “I’m finding a big plus to being a person “of a certain age.” And that is that I believe in more possibilities than I did when I was younger… Possibilities. What doors have you closed and either forgotten about or too stubbornly ignored? Is it time, perhaps, to go oil the lock and hunt out the key?”

I ran across two additional responses to the FTC Guidelines for Bloggers:

Quick hits:

  • Kate Coombs shares five great out of print read-alouds at Book Aunt.
  • At Tea CozyLiz B shares information about the ALA’s Great Stories Club: “The Great Stories Club reaches underserved, troubled teen populations through books that are relevant to their lives. Libraries located within or working in partnership with facilities serving troubled teens (including juvenile justice facilities, alternative high schools, drug rehabilitation centers and nonprofits serving teen parents) are eligible to apply.”
  • Liz is also continuing her series of informational posts. This week she talks about children’s and young adult literature listservs.
  • Pam Coughlan has a repeat of an excellent article that she wrote about being a mother and a reader (they don’t call her MotherReader for nothing).
  • The Shrinking Violets have an interview with Laurie Helgoe, author of Introvert Power (which I reviewed here). This is an interview that particularly resonated with me (as did the book).
  • Terry Doherty has a great post at Booklights about Easy Readers (starting with The Cat in the Hat, of course, and including the Geisel and Cybils awards). This week’s Show and Tale at Booklights is Eloise.
  • Angie from Angieville has good news for fans of Dennis Lehane’s Patrick Kenzie/Angela Gennaro mystery series (like me).
  • Don’t forget that next week is Teen Read Week. See more details about the Readergirlz plans at Miss Erin.
  • A new issue of Notes from the Horn Book is now available, featuring an interview with Kristin Cashore.
  • The authors at The Spectacle are discussing Suzanne Collins’ Catching Fire (with spoilers).
  • Monica Edinger links to a New Yorker article by Daniel Zalewski about how strongly kids seem to be in charge in today’s picture books. He criticizes a number of modern books for their portrayal of browbeaten parents and rampaging kids (citing Kevin Henkes as an exception).
  • See more news at Terry’s Tuesday Blurbs post at the Reading Tub. She is highly recommending “the pictures from the Read for the Record event at Nationals Park”, and I agree with her.

That’s all I have for news for this week. I’ll be taking a few days off from the blog to attend KidLitCon. Ironic, I know, that I won’t be blogging because of a blogging conference. But there you have it. I have left a review or two queued up for delayed posting. Wishing you all a lovely weekend!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Wednesday
Oct072009

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: October 7

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

It’s been another active week around the Kidlitosphere. Here’s my take on the highlights and lowlights.

JOMB_bookmarkFirst of all, please join me in sending good thoughts to Andrea Ross from Just One More Book!, who was just diagnosed with breast cancer. Andrea’s husband and JOMB co-founder, Mark Blevisreported today that “The Just One More Book!! children’s book podcast will be taking an indefinite hiatus so that Andrea and I can focus on making Andrea a Breast Cancer survivor.” Mark also included a few statistics in his post that show, if anyone needs to see it, how much JOMB has done to promote children’s love of books these past few years. Andrea and Mark have my deepest of good wishes, in fighting this battle. Also, if there’s anyone out there who might have doubts as to whether the Kidlitosphere, a virtual community, is a real community, just check out the comments on Mark’s post already.

This is a bit circular, but Liz B. recently profiled my Afternoon Visits series at A Chair, A Fireplace, and A Tea Cozy. If you’re reading this, you already, by definition, know about my afternoon visits posts. But still, I’d like to thank Liz for the write-up, part of a series that she’s been doing about ongoing events around the Kidlitosphere (including Poetry Friday, founded by Kelly Herold, and Nonfiction Monday, founded by Anastasia Suen).

Liz also wrote an excellent post recently listing professional sources for reviews of children’s and young adult literature. She calls it her “if you’re reading children’s books and want more reviews” list. She warns: “The primary audience for many of the reviews in these journals is adult gate keepers. The review isn’t for the end-reader but for a person buying materials for the end-reader. In other words? Yes, there may be spoilers.” Looking at all of Liz’s recent content together, one thing is clear to me. If you’re writing online reviews of children’s and young adult books, and/or you’re interested in being part of the community of other people doing this, you should be reading Tea Cozy.

One another thing that Liz has been on top of is this whole FTC Disclosure Guidelines issue. If you’ve somehow missed it, the FTC issued guidelines (link goes to PDF) for bloggers this week regarding disclosure of relationships with publishers. The implications for book bloggers are problematic, to say the least. The FTC seems to be declaring that any mention of a book (in a blog post or tweet or Facebook comment) is an “endorsement” (at least if the book was received from a publisher OR you are an Amazon Affiliate), and that review copies can be considered in some sense “compensation”. There’s also a suggestion of returning review books to the publisher, to avoid them being considered compensation. All of this shows that the FTC doesn’t at all understand how book blogging work. Nonetheless, there are some stiff fines involved for violations, and this is something that bloggers should be taking seriously. These are going to be laws that, even if they don’t fully make sense to us, could be enforced. We’re going to see a lot of discussion of this issue, on blogs and listservs and Twitter, while we see how it all shakes out. The regulations go into effect December 1st. It is not out of the question that many of us will no longer be accepting review copies after that, though I hope it doesn’t come to such a drastic response.

If you’d like to learn more, you should probably start with Ed Campion’s interview with Richard Cleland from the FTC about specific applicability to book bloggers. Then move on to these two posts from Colleen Mondor at Chasing Ray. Then go to GalleyCat, and read all of Ron Hogan’s posts from this week (especially this one). You might also check out responses at MotherReaderthe Book Smugglersthe Reading TubKids LitThe Cybils blog, and Confessions of a Bibliovore.

NonfictionmondayGetting back to regular news, this week’s Nonfiction Monday roundup is at Moms Inspire Learning.

Steph at Steph Su Reads has some suggestions for authors seeking reviews and for reviewers seeking books. I think that she makes some good points, and I especially agree with her top suggestion: personalization. Review requests that start with “Hey there” or “Dear Blogger” don’t exactly endear themselves to me. I’ll likely post on this topic myself later in the year. I’ve started a little file with some pet peeves.

At Shrinking Violet Promotions, Mary and Robin interview Egmont publisher Elizabeth Law about marketing and book promotion techniques for authors. Here are a couple of tidbits that struck me: “We used to send authors on the road more, and we used to encourage them to go into every bookstore within a few hours’ drive of their house and sign books, do appearances, etc. Now we love it if they have a website, get to know bloggers and librarians online, etc” and “Authors who give thoughtful recommendations of others’ books, or who comment on writers’ LiveJournal blogs for example, are showing that they are interested in good books as a whole, and not just their own.”

Cybils2009-150pxNominations continue to roll in for the Cybils, at this half-way point in the nomination cycle. On this post, you can find the link to the nomination form, and to the lists of nominated titles so far. We’re closing in on 600 eligible titles. Nominations will remain open through the end of the day on October 15th.

KidLitCon-badgeMotherReader has some updates regarding KidLitCon (which is NEXT WEEK). The biggest news is that there’s now an author signing event (featuring 6 authors) taking place on Sunday at Hooray for Books!.

Quick Hits:

  • Kate Messner suggests five ways to celebrate National Reading Group month.
  • As pretty much a direct result of blogging and Twittering by Carol Rasco, RIF has launched a new series of real-world author visits. First up is the Kidlitosphere’s own Laurel Snyder. I found this a nice example of the tangible connections that can come from blogging.
  • Greg Pincus has updated his “I’m Pretty Well Connected” social web poem.
  • At SemicolonSherry Early asks: “What good books would you recommend for children and young adults that feature characters living in poverty or in lower middle class financial stress? How does this choice of socioeconomic class on the part of an author affect the book and its characters’ choices?”
  • Colleen has a new installment of What a Girl Wants at Chasing Ray. This week’s theme is “holding out for a super heroine”. She asks her stellar panel of contributors: “So does it matter if girls only have Wonder Woman to read about as a major super heroine and that all the other women are relegated to “supporting” status? Are we missing something important or is this just all too testosterone fueled anyway? Do girls even want more super heroines?” 
  • Did you hear that Harriet the Spy is being reinvented as a bloggerMonica Edinger has the scoop at Educating Alice.
  • Christine M reports at The Simple and the Ordinary that today is National Walk Your Child to School Day. While this post is probably a bit late for that to be useful, Christine’s general reasons why it’s important for kids to walk to school are timeless.

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Sunday
Oct042009

Sunday Afternoon Visits: October 4

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I did a pretty thorough Kidlitosphere roundup on Wednesday (though some of you may have missed it, because I was having some temporary technical problems with my blog this week - apologies). Anyway, I have just a few additional links to share with you today.

Cybils2009-150pxFirst up, the Cybils nomination process is going strong. As I write this, there have been more than 400 eligible nominations. There have been some great, great titles nominated. You can view the lists of nominated titles (complete with cover images, and the name of the person who nominated each book), here:

We’ve also been continuing to roll out profiles of Cybils organizers, lists of panelists, and introductions to the various categories. There are too many posts to link to - I recommend that you go to the Cybils blog, and check it out. You can also follow the Cybils on Twitter. Last, but not least, you can find some great tips for new Cybils panelists at Abby (the) Librarian.

At A Chair, A Fireplace and a Tea Cozy, Liz B. offers an introduction to Poetry Friday, and a thank you to PF founder Kelly Herold. (Liz also links to Susan Thomsen’s previously written and definitive intro to PF). Fittingly, this week’s Poetry Friday roundup is at Crossover, Kelly’s new blog. Like Liz, I don’t end up participating in Poetry Friday all that often these days. I have trouble with scheduled events, beyond my own roundups and PBS posts and so on. But I still think that Poetry Friday is one of the jewels of the Kidlitosphere, a weekly celebration of poetry, spread across a variety of different blogs, completely volunteer run, and fully democratic.

Ellen Hopkins continues to face book challenge drama. She says: “the superintendent of schools in Moore OK … preemptively pulled all my books from all her schools “as a precaution.”” Nice. Don’t even put the book banners to the trouble of mounting challenges - just remove everything. Maureen has a roundup of some other Banned Book Week links at Confessions of a BibliovoreColleen Mondor shares her thoughts on several related topics (with lots of discussion in the comments) at Chasing Ray.

At The Happy Accident, Greg Pincus has a great post about #kidlitchat, Twitter, and community. He explains the goal that he and Bonnie Adamson had in starting the weekly chats in the first place (to build community), and the benefits that are already coming out of these sessions. Like this one: “Each member of our individual networks sees our passion and, if they want, can see our community in action – sharing, laughing, supporting, learning. We can be emissaries for children’s literature as a group, far more than we can as individuals.” How great is that?

Quick hits:

  • Pam Coughlan has some new details about KidLitCon at MotherReader, as well as links to some external articles that show why authors can’t “afford not to invest in learning more about blogging, social media, and online presence.”
  • Sherry has a new installment of her Saturday Review of Books at Semicolon. This is a regular Semicolon feature, in which a host of bloggers submit links to a review from the week (it’s supposed to one review, but lots of people apparently link to all of these reviews). Anyway, it’s a nice place for browsing.
  • At Literacy, families, and learning, Trevor Cairney has a detailed piece about the importance of historical fiction, and why children should be encouraged to read it. He gives lots of examples.
  • Monica Edinger links from Educating Alice to some points at the SLJ Heavy Medal blog on the Newbery Award, audience, and insensitivity. She calls it “Hard stuff, but important. Highly recommended.”
  • Esme Raji Codell has a fun post at PlanetEsme highlighting “great new books about books and writing”.
  • Abby (the) Librarian has a few more links in her Around the Interwebs post from Friday. Karen has still more links at Teenage Fiction for the Ages, in her Links from the Blogosphere post. And still more from Gwenda Bond at Shaken & Stirred and from Book Dads in their Weekend Wander.
  • There’s a nice post at the ESSL Children’s Literature Blog from Nancy O’Brien listing children’s literature on multicultural families.
  • The featured author at Readergirlz this month is Libba Bray.
  • At 100 Scope Notes, Travis posts several Wild Things links. Are you interested in Where the Wild Things Are tattoos? I’ll bet Betsy is. And just in case that’s not enough Wild Things news for you, Elaine Magliaro links to a Boston Globe article about how Maurice Sendak made the world safe for monsters.
  • And in closing, my favorite blog post of the weekLaini Taylor posted photos of her husband, Jim di Bartolo, reading to their baby. She’s looking straight at the book. She’s smiling. The photos are perfect! Do click through. They’ll brighten your day.

And that’s all for today. Hope you’ve all been having a lovely weekend!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

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