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This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Entries in Shannon Hale (5)

Monday
Aug252014

KidLitCon 2014 Program

Kidlitcon 2014: Blogging Diversity in Young Adult and Children’s Lit: What’s Next?
October 11 and 12, 2014  Tsakopoulos Library Galleria, Sacramento, CA (Link to KidLitCon Main Page)

Friday, October 11 

8:30-9:30 Registration

9:30-9:55  Welcome and Opening Remarks

10-10:50 A  Finding Your Voice, Finding Your Passion- Blogging With Conviction 

Charlotte Taylor Charlotte’s Library

Blogging is hard work, made easier by passion. Having an intense focus (such as a passion for some aspect of diversity, or some particular sub-genre) can both motivate the blogger and help the blog find its audience. But passion and conviction by themselves aren’t enough to make a blog a success for both its writer(s) and its readers—you have to be able to communicate them effectively. Topics in this session will include how to find the voice, or voices, that work for you, and how to use them to make a stronger, more powerful blog. 

10-10:50 B   Finding and Reviewing the Best in Diverse Children’s and YA

Nathalie Mvondo Multiculturalism Rocks!
Gayle Pitman The Active Voice
Kim Baccellia Si, Se Puede- Yes, You Can! 

Many bloggers want to review more diverse books, but are uncertain about where to find the best ones, and are uncertain how to evaluate and promote them. This session, featuring three bloggers who focus on multicultural and LBGT books,  will help bloggers get diverse books onto their blogs and into the hand so young readers.  

11-11:50 A    Sistahs (and Brothers) Are Doing It for Themselves  — Independent Publishing From the Creators’ and the Bloggers’ Points of View    

Laura Atkins Laura Atkins, Children’s Book Editor
Zetta Elliott Fledgling
Libertad Thomas Twinja Book Reviews and (with co-blogger Guinevere Thomas) Diverse Book Tours

Is it possible, in a publishing world that so dramatically lacks diversity in its offerings, to provide viable alternatives, using people power to provide books that all children in this country can relate to and enjoy? We think so! An ever growing number of authors and illustrators are independently creating children’s books, and many of these are about diverse subjects and children. An editor, and author and self-publisher, and a blogger come together to talk about different models and approaches to creating independent children’s’ books, and the role of bloggers in publicizing them, with a discussion of reviewing self-published books from the blogger’s point of view. 

11-11:50 B Social Media Tips and Tricks for Bloggers

Kelly Jensen (Stacked and Book Riot)

You write a blog post and now you want people to find it. This session will give you tips and tricks for best social media practices across a variety of platforms, including Tumblr, Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook. Learn how to build an engaged and excited readership, as well as how to manage the nitty-gritty components of social media. Whether you’re new at it or you fancy yourself a seasoned pro, you’ll learn some new best practices.  

12-1:30 Lunch (box lunches included in price of registration)   

This first lunch will feature optional talk clusters, where bloggers can gather with those who share their particular interests (such as “diverse spec. fic”  “picture book reviewing”  “middle grade books”  “LBTG” etc.), with the option of general seating as well. (Please share ideas for conversational groups with Charlotte Taylor (charlotteslibrary@gmail.com). 

1:30-3   Getting Beyond Diversity and Getting to the Story 

Edith Campbell Crazy Quilt Edi
Hannah Gómez  sarah HANNAH gómez
Jewell Parker Rhodes 

While gender identity, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, or ability add to who we are, they do not define who we are. And these differences do not define our stories. How do we teach, discuss, or describe diverse books without making diversity the issue? Should we? How do we respond to the perception that ʺdiverse booksʺ are only for ʺdiverse peopleʺ and deliver book reviews and essays that highlight what makes books universal for those disinclined to think diversity is for them while acknowledging readers who need and deserve to find themselves in literature? Presenters Edith Campbell, Hannah Gómez, and author Jewell Parker Rhodes will deliver an interactive session with talking points, booktalks, strategies and much honest discussion.

3-5 Author Mix and Mingle

Meet and mingle with authors, publishers, and of course fellow bloggers! Signed books to buy, swag and ARCs to snag, good conversations to be had. 

Dinner (paid for individually) at The River City Brewing Company 

Saturday, October 11

8-9 Registration for new arrivals

9-10 KEYNOTE  Mitali Perkins— Can Bloggers Diversify the Children’s Book World? You Bet We Can.

Blogger and author Mitali Perkins will share stories of how some key blogs have made a difference through the years, offer practical tips on how to influence our circle of blog readers, and discuss how to integrate our social media platforms with our blogs for maximum impact. 

Mitali Perkins (mitaliperkins.com) has written nine novels for young readers, including Rickshaw Girl (chosen by the New York Public Library as one of the top 100 books for children in the past 100 years) and Bamboo People (an American Library Association’s Top Ten Novels for Young Adults, starred in Publishers Weekly as “a graceful exploration of the redemptive power of love, family, and friendship.”) Mitali graduated from Stanford University in Political Science and received her Masters in Public Policy from U.C. Berkeley. After spending 13 winters in Boston, she now lives and writes in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her blog, “Mitali’s Fire Escape: A Safe Place to Think, Chat, and Read About Life Between Cultures” (mitaliblog.com), has been around since April 23, 2005. 

10-10:25 Break

10:25 -11:05  Beyond the Echo Chamber of the Kidlitosphere: Reaching Readers.

So you’ve read the book and written your review. Now what? Learn where the readers are, how to reach them and what to say so they’ll listen.  

Pam Margolis, Unconventional Librarian

11:15 to 12:  Skype session with Shannon Hale

12-1:30 Lunch (box lunches included in the price of registration)

1:30-3  We Need Diverse Books Presents:  Book Bloggers and Diversity, an Unbeatable Combination  with Mike Jung, Karen Sandler, S.E. Sinkhorn, and Martha White 

In the first part of this session, the panelists will share the lessons learned from the very successful #WeNeedDiverseBooks social media campaign with regard to crafting your message, using your message, and establishing an emotional connection. Second, the panelists will focus on how diverse children’s literature can enrich our blogs, and how authors and editors can further expand the content available to us.

3:-3:30 Break

3:30-5  We’re Not Going To Take It and Neither Should You: Why Book Bloggers DO Have the Ability to Make Divers Books Happen

Hannah Gómez  sarah HANNAH gómez
Kelly Jensen Stacked and Book Riot
Faythe Arrendondo YALSA-The Hub
Summer Khaleq Miss Fictional’s World of YA Books 

We know bloggers matter to the publishing industry and to readers. And we know reading diversely is important for all readers, as it opens up your worldview. But how can bloggers effect positive change when it comes to diversity? This session will explore the ways bloggers can audit their own reading habits, assess and address personal biases, as well as create and curate stronger content as it relates to diversity in all shapes and forms — race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, body image, and more. We’ll offer tools and tips for not just finding and highlighting diverse reads, but also how to advocate for diversity within one’s own blog and beyond. This is more than an awareness of diversity; it’s an opportunity and an obligation for active change.

5-9 Banquet at The Citizen Hotel (included in conference price)

____

We welcome your feedback about the 2014 KidLitCon!

Charlotte Taylor: Program Coordinator

with:

Sarah Stevenson and Tanita Davis and Jen Robinson: Co-Chairs
Reshama Deshmukh and Melissa Fox: Author Coordinators
Maureen Kearney: Registration Coordinator 

_____

Pre-registration for KidlitCon 2014 has closed. We will have on-site registration, payable by check, October 10 and 11 at the Citizen Hotel in Sacramento, CA.

Friday
Aug282009

Friday Afternoon Visits: August 28

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Kidlitosphere_buttonMy blogging time has been limited for the past couple of weeks, due to a combination of guests, travel, and Internet access woes. Fortunately, I had a few reviews stored up, which kept the blog from going dark. But I’ve missed out on a lot of activities going on around the Kidlitosphere. Today, I’ve managed to catch up on the past couple of weeks of kidlit blog news.

Cybils2009-Web-SmallThe call for judges for this year’s Cybils Award process went out earlier this week. Here’s the scoop: “If you:

  • blog about some aspect of children’s or teen books on at least a somewhat consistent basis;
  • or contribute regularly to a group blog about same;
  • know a thing or two about what kids/teens are reading these days;
  • are planning to be reading obsessively over the next few months anyway

…we may have a spot for you. You start by emailing us at cybils09 (at) gmail (dot) com. It’s a group email so that our organizers can get excited when they see the names coming in from prospective volunteers.” (Do click through to read the full announcement first.) I’ll be continuing as Literacy Evangelist for this year’s Cybils, and I know for certain that a result of the process is going to be fabulous lists of books. I hope that many of your will participate. Also, have you seen our gorgeous new logo? It’s the work of the multi-talented Sarah Stevenson (aka aquafortis). I love it!

Two of the savviest bloggers I know, Mark Blevis from Just One More Book!! and Greg Pincus from Gotta Book and The Happy Accident, are teaming up on a new project. According to the Just One More Book!! newsletter, they’re going to “deliver a series of free webcasts that will give book publishers, publicists, authors, illustrators and enthusiasts social media savvy for outreach and promotion.” You can find more information here. Congratulations to Andrea and Mark of JOMB on their third blogging anniversary, too.

Mary Lee and Franki from A Year of Reading have started a new “lifetime of reading gallery”. Here’s the scoop: “Members of the Kidlitosphere are invited to submit stories from their reading lives. Your submission can be an anecdote from childhood, a recent experience around books or reading, a memory from school (good or bad), a vignette about learning to read, the impact of a particular book—anything about your life as a reader. We are looking for a variety of short pieces (think blog post length) from anyone in the Kidlitosphere, including bloggers, authors, illustrators, readers of blogs, etc. Our gallery is open to everyone who is a blogger, blog reader, author, illustrator, blog reader, blog commenter, etc.” [And while you’re thinking about reading memories, Charles from online children’s bookstore Through the Magic Door is also looking for submissions in that area.]

Pam Coughlan (MotherReader) is guest blogging at ForeWord Magazine’s Shelf Space this month. This week she has a new post “about saving time, money, and energy at your library during this difficult economic climate.” Dedicated community builder that she is, Pam also wrote a must-read post at MotherReader recently reminding people not to let an addiction to Twitter keep them from taking time to comment on blog posts. She says: I don’t want to come off as angry or peevish, and I hope that those of you who follow me understand that. I do think commenting is important and is something that we are losing in our community to the detriment of all.” And she discusses the benefits to the person commenting, in terms of exposure. There is, appropriately, an interesting discussion in the comments, some of which points out ways that Twitter and blog comments can complement each other. Personally, I like Twitter for broadcasting news tidbits, but I find that I prefer my blog or Facebook for back and forth discussion in the comments. It’s easier to see the whole thread. But I’ve found new friends on Twitter, too. It’s an interesting balance. But do check out Pam’s post, and the comments. See also a getting started guide for Twitter, prepared by Mitali Perkins.

Speaking of people who inspire lots of comments, My Friend Amy has taken on a couple of interesting topics this week. Yesterday, she asked: “what themes draw you in when reading?” Today, she asks “how important are likeable characters?” Both posts have tons of comments. I was particularly interested in the themes question. Here’s an abridged version of my response: “My favorite sub-genre is dystopian fiction. I think as a theme I’m drawn to a larger question of identity (as mentioned be Lenore and Alexa). I’m curious about what happens when the traditional constraints of society are removed. How to individuals rise to the challenge? How does society reform? Which values are internal, and which are imposed by society? I’m also drawn to tween books where the characters are just starting to think about growing up, dating, etc. Perhaps this is identity, as framed by separation from the family (just as the dystopia books are identity as framed by separation from society… interesting parallel).”

And still speaking of people who inspire many comments, Shannon Hale published a new installment in her fabulous “How to be a reader” series last week. This one is about book evaluation vs. self-evaluation. Shannon talks specifically about star ratings on reader reviews, and calls the practice into question, saying (among other excellent points) “In my opinion, there are more interesting questions to ask myself after reading a book than what I would rate it… I wonder if book evaluation is trumping self-evaluation. I wonder if we get so caught up in gushing or bashing, shining up those stars or taking them away, that the reading experience is weighed too heavily on the side of the book itself and not enough on the reader.” She also includes a quiz for people who review books. Tanita Davis responds at Finding Wonderland. Liz B responds at Tea Cozy, here and here. Like Liz and Tanita, I don’t include ratings in my reviews. It just seems arbitrary. I’d rather talk about the book, and what I liked or didn’t like, or what I thought was particularly well done. Most of the time, any review from me is an implied “thumbs up” anyway, because I don’t tend to spend my time reviewing books that I don’t think are worth my reviewing time. Still, there’s a lot of great food for thought in Shannon’s post, the comments, and Liz and Tanita’s responses.

Quick hits:

  • Also from Liz B, a survey about time spent blogging. For me, today, it’s going to be something like 8 hours. But that’s not typical. Really.
  • Today’s Poetry Friday roundup is at Kate Coombs’ blog, Book Aunt.
  • Kirby Larson has been hosting a discussion panel on the topic of gender in reading and writing. Here are Part 1 (about the reading histories of the 10 panelists), Part 2 (about “girl books” vs. “boy books”), and Part 3 (books that appeal regardless of gender). (updated to add Part 4)
  • Elaine Magliaro shares an excellent list of links to back to school booklists and other resources at Wild Rose Reader.
  • At Literate Lives, Karen writes about a first day of school author visit from Margaret Peterson Haddix. How great is that for getting kids excited about being back at school?
  • Franki Sibberson shares her reflections, pros and cons, on reading via Kindle. Overall, she sees the Kindle as her primary reading source for the future.
  • Charlotte from Charlotte’s Library (with help from various commenters) muses on fantasy books that include girls who like to read.
  • At Confessions of a BibliovoreMaureen takes on Susan’s recent Booklights question about books that you’d like to read again for the first time. Maureen talks about books that she’s re-read, and found more the second (or third or tenth) time.
  • Kelly at YAnnabe shares 7 ways to revive your love of reading. She even suggests having a friend or partner read aloud to you, if you need to bring back the fun of reading.
  • Tif from Tif Talks Books writes about books as bridges, saying “I have discovered that books can truly be a bridge … a connection … something that can help many of us relate despite our differences.” 
  • Abby (the) Librarian has more Kidlitosphere links, if you’re still hungry for news. So does MotherReader.
  • Last, but not least, don’t forget to register for KidLitCon 2009.

I hope to be back this weekend with an installment of my “reviews that made me want the book” feature. That would let me finish cleaning up my Google Reader in quite a satisfactory fashion. And it’s an excellent baseball task. Happy reading, all!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Friday
Dec052008

Friday Afternoon Visits: December 5

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I find myself with a bit of time to spare this afternoon, before what promises to be a hectic weekend, so I thought that I would share a few Kidlitosphere links with you.

Fresh off the comment challenge, MotherReader has been coming up with her usual amazing lists of ways to give a book. These are lists pairing books with something else, “to give it that fun factor”. You can find the lists herehereherehere, and, the newest one, here. The suggestions include things like “What else can go with Monkey With A Tool Belt but a tool belt?” Can’t argue with that one, Pam! You can also find links to tons of other lists of holiday book recommendations at Chasing Ray. Seriously. There is no excuse for NOT buying books for the holidays, with all the energy people have been putting into providing gift ideas through Colleen’s 12 Days of Christmas event. I’m especially appreciating Sarah’s Tween Book-Buying Guides at The Reading Zone, and Susan’s tracking of “best of” lists at Chicken Spaghetti.

SolvangSherrie has a lovely little post about the joy of raising readers at Write About Now. Her first grade daughter reads aloud to the Kindergarten class every week, with great pride.

There are author interviews all over the place this week. But two interviews that I particularly enjoyed were of fellow bloggers. Maureen at Kid Tested, Librarian Approved interviewed Anastasia Suen, organizer for the Cybils Easy Reader committee, about what makes a book an easy reader, and how adults should use them with kids. Jon Bard at Children’s Writing Web Journal interviewed Abby (the) Librarian about what she’s learned from her blog, and what she likes to see in books. I’m completely with Abby about didactic books, and her recommendation of The Hunger Games.

Jill has a must-read guest post at The Well-Read Child. Author Maxwell Eaton shares 10 Tips for the Parents of Ricky the Reluctant Reader, in comic strip form. The tips for dealing with reluctant readers are dead-on, and the format is funny and engaging. As fellow commenter Jeremy said: “this 10-tips comic should be distributed far and wide.” I really like the way Jill has been branching out from doing traditional author interviews to ask authors abut literacy and raising readers.

Authors thinking about starting a blog, or about what their goals are for their blog, might appreciate this sixth blog anniversary post by Shannon Hale. She talks about her goals for the blog, and her struggles. I especially liked: “I blog to promote ongoing literacy. I love to recommend books I’m passionate about, so that readers who like my books don’t stop here but keep reading, or parents and teachers can get good suggestions for all kinds of readers.” That’s the kind of thing that keeps someone like me coming back.

There have been a few tempests in the normally cozy teapot of the Kidlitosphere this week. One was started by The LiteraBuss, with a post called “Must NOT Read List For Elementary School (Books That Were Once Great But Have Become Irrelevant)”. I mean, anyone who is going to call To Kill A Mockingbird “trash” (admittedly in the context of classroom reading, but still…) is going to raise a few eyebrows. See follow-on posts at The LiteraBuss here and here, and at Charlotte’s Library.

A School Library Journal article by Gail Giles has also triggered some conflict. Addressing the question of why boys generally don’t read as much as girls do, Gail comes to the conclusion that boys don’t have enough male role models demonstrating reading. She’s pretty blunt about it: “Now, this is purely my opinion, but children copy their elders. They want to be what they see. A boy doesn’t want to be a woman. He wants to do what a man does. And if he doesn’t see a man reading, he won’t read.” Colleen Mondor begs to differ at Guys Lit Wire, saying “I do not think that boys (or girls) read or don’t read because of what other people do (or don’t do) in their homes.” Carlie Webber, on the other hand, thinks that Gail raises a valid point, concluding “I think that male role models are only one of many factors in getting boys to read, but they’re an important factor.” Tricia at The Miss Rumphius Effect asks “Why do we give boys so little credit? Why the gross generalizations?” She has a bit of a discussion going in the comments, if you’d like to participate.

In other interesting chat, there’s discussion about why “girl books” focus on home (see Kids Lit), what girls want in literature, and when a personal area of expertise leads to a “fail” moment when you’re reading. Lisa Chellman has links for those last two. Doret also writes about what’s NOT urban lit at TheHappyNappyBookseller. And, though this isn’t particularly controversial, Stacy DeKeyser proposes a definition of young adult fiction at Reading, writing, and chocolate.

In closing, two reminders to appreciate each day. Well-known blogger Dewey from The Hidden Side of a Leaf passed away over Thanksgiving weekend. There have been various tributes across the blogs, and you can read an outpouring of comments at Dewey’s blog. And, as if she hadn’t had enough loss for one year, Amanda from A Patchwork of Books lost her mother, unexpectedly. Amanda expects to be back to blogging soon, though, because it helps her to have something normal in her life. So, in memory of Dewey, and of Amanda’s son and mother, show a little extra appreciation for the people in your life this weekend. You won’t regret it.

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Sunday
Sep212008

Sunday Afternoon Visits: September 21

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

CybilslogosmallLast week was a bit hectic, between Book Blogger Appreciation Week (the complete list of winners is here) and the announcement of the first Cybils panels (PoetryMiddle Grade FictionFiction Picture Books, and Easy Readers, so far). But I did save up a few other links.

Iloveyourblog_thumb_thumb_2I’m honored to have received this beautiful “I (heart) your blog” award from both Becky of Becky’s Book Reviews and Andrea from Just One More Book!. I’m touched, Andrea and Becky! I love your blogs, too. I’m supposed to nominate seven other blogs, and pass along the award, and tell them each that they’ve been nominated. You all know my position on that — I feel that I show my appreciation for the blogs that I love by linking to them in my visits posts. And yet… this week I feel like I should do more. So, I’d like to go a bit further, and offer this award to the dozen blogs that I added when I first created my blog roll, almost three years ago, and that remain among my favorite sites: Finding WonderlandBartographyRead RogerRead AlertKids LitChicken SpaghettiTea CozyBig A little aWands and WorldsBook MootBook Buds, and What Adrienne Thinks About That. I had pretty good judgment back then, didn’t I? You guys all rock, and I do love your blogs. If you feel so inclined, please do pass along the award to others.

  • This just in, the September Carnival of Children’s Literature is now available at Jenny’s Wonderland of BooksJenny includes quite a few links to reviews of classic children’s books, as well as more modern fare. Jenny and I share a fondness for Alexander Key’s The Forgotten Door, which makes me happy. You can also “Submit your blog article to the next edition of Carnival of Children’s Literature which will be held October 26, 2008 at The Well-Read Child using our carnival submission form.”
  • Speaking of Just One More Book!, Andrea and Mark have started an e-newsletter. The first edition contained: “announcements about (their) upcoming: * Picture Book Pilgrimage, * children’s book and literacy related conference activities, and * exciting autumn guests.” You can sign up here.
  • Two fun posts from Emily at BookKids (the BookPeople Children’s Book blog): Kids Books are for Grown-Ups, Too! and Grown-Up Books to Share with Kids & Teens. Of course I favor the former over the latter - Emily picked some great titles.
  • Congratulations to Susan Beth Pfeffer, whose Life As We Knew It made the NY Times Bestseller List for paperback children’s books for the first time this week. She is very happy. I’m happy, too, because it’s one of my favorite books. 
  • Shrinking Violet Promotions has a reissue of a great post about self-care for introverts. If you missed this one last year, and you think you might be an introvert, you should definitely click through to check this one out. 
  • I missed Talk Like a Pirate Day on Friday. But Sherry from Semicolon and Elizabeth O. Dulemba did not, and they have the scoop. 
  • Elaine Magliaro shares poetry resources about fall at Wild Rose Reader. I especially like how she uses fall colors for highlighting throughout the post.
  • Jenny from Read. Imagine. Talk has a guest post at 5 Minutes for Books this week. She writes aboutchildren’s books based on television shows, and has some surprisingly positive things to say. Also at 5 Minutes for BooksLauren from Baseball and Bows shares a delightful story about her young son’s degree of bookworm-ness.
  • Shannon Hale has a lovely new post in her “how to be a reader” series. This one is about “reviewing the review”, and who, and what, a review is really for. My favorite sentence is “A review can turn the intimate experience of reading into a conversation that enlightens both sides.” I like that idea a lot. Reading is such a solitary experience, usually, but in reviewing a book, we open up avenues for discussion. I like that! 
  • And finally, my heart goes out to Amanda from A Patchwork of Books on the sad news about her son. I don’t know why terrible things happen to good people, I really don’t. But it does kind of put the recent financial news into perspective…

Wishing you all a peaceful week.

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Saturday
Aug092008

Saturday Afternoon Visits: August 9

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

My blog vacation ended up lasting a bit longer than I originally planned. Turned out I kind of enjoyed just reading and relaxing and not trying to keep up with reviews and other blog posts. I’ve been reading some great books. But several things have cropped up that I simply must highlight here.

  • Sheila Ruth recently put out a call for help at Wands and Worlds. She’s hoping to encourage authors and illustrators, and other interested parties, to donate books as prizes for The Brightspirit Relief Fund’s upcoming auction. The fund was started in honor of 10-year-old Emmy Grace Cherry, who died, along with her parents, in a tornado in February. There’s a whole connection (including the name Brightspirit) with the Warriors series, by Emmy’s favorite author Erin Hunter, but I’ll let Sheila tell you the whole story. Please do click through and read Sheila’s moving words about this young booklover, who didn’t get to read nearly enough stories.
  • BlogsawardWhile I was away, I was nominated by several wonderful people for blog awards. Abby (the) Library nominated me for the Brillante Weblog Premio Award (which I had also received previously from Andrea and Mark at Just One More Book!). And then Lenore also awarded this to me at Presenting Lenore.
  • PremioarteypicoStacey from Two Writing Teachers and Megan Germano from Read, Read, Read then each awarded me the Arte Y Pico Award, “based on creativity, design, interesting material, and contribution to the blogger community.” I was overwhelmed by this outpouring of support, especially during a time that I was not even blogging. This Kidlitosphere is such an amazing place to be. I know that I’m supposed to pass on the awards, but I’m sticking to my standard response - if I mention you in one of my Visits or Literacy Round-Up posts, then I admire your blog, and feel that it makes an important contribution to the blogger community. Many, many thanks!
  • Getting back to business, I enjoyed this post by Bill at Literate Lives, about creating lifelong readers. Bill says “I think sometimes we’re too hard on ourselves as teachers and parents. I also think some of what is seen as best practice sometimes does more harm than good.” He follows up with some concrete examples from his own experiences, about what does and doesn’t make reading a pleasurable experience. This is must-read stuff!
  • I’m late in pointing to this, but there are many interesting posts in this month’s Carnival of Children’s Literature, hosted by Jenny at Read. Imagine. Talk. Jenny offers personal comments regarding many of the posts, making this one a fun, chatty version of the monthly carnival. Next month’s carnival will be hosted by Susan at Chicken Spaghetti
  • Speaking of the community of children’s and young adult book bloggers, have you registered yet for the Portland KidLit Conference? The conference will be held on September 27th, at the Sheraton Portland Airport. I know that airfares are high these days, but the conference fees and hotel fees are quite reasonable. If you can at all swing it, do come! I promise that you’ll be glad that you did.   
  • Our very own Liz Burns from Tea Cozy has a book coming out this week (with Sophie Brookover). It’s called Pop Goes the Library: Using Pop Culture to Connect With Your Whole Community. There’s also a new companion blog to the book, and a wiki with tons of resources. And, as if that wasn’t enough, Pop Goes the Library (the blog) got a recent shout-out from NPR. Congratulations, Liz!! I look forward to celebrating with you at the KidLit Conference.
  • Speaking of NPR, our own Gwenda Bond from Shaken and Stirred was recently featured in NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, talking about Anne of Green Gables. She says, among other things, “It’s almost impossible to imagine what children’s books would be like without this book and its history”.
  • Online Education Database recently published a list of 100 Places to Connect with Other Bibliophiles Online. The list includes 10 sites for Children and Teens, though the list doesn’t seem to distinguish between which are truly sites for kids, and which are site about books for kids (as Tricia also pointed out at The Miss Rumphius Effect). 
  • Rick Riordan recently linked to a Wall Street Journal article about engaging boys as readers. The title of the article is: Problem: Boys Don’t Like to Read. Solution: Books That Are Really Gross. Rick concludes: “I’m not sure I agree that a “boy-friendly” book has to be gross. I think plot, humor and action are a lot more important, although as a male reader, I certainly don’t mind a little grossness now and then. Still, this article is definitely worth a read!”
  • The latest pick in Al Roker’s Today Show Book Club for Kids is Rapunzel’s Revenge, written by Shannon and Dean Hale, and illustrated by Nathan Hale (no relation). You can read Shannon’s response here. Seems to me that they’ve done a nice job picking fun, kid-friendly titles for this book club.
  • Open Education has an interesting post about how “our risk averse culture continues to undermine the development of children.”
  • And finally, tomorrow (Sunday) I’m scheduled to have a guest post up at 5 Minutes for Books, with thanks to Jennifer Donovan from Snapshot. It’s a republication, slightly edited, of my Read the Books that Your Children Read post, one of my all-time favorites. I hope that you’ll check it out, along with the other great resources at 5 Minutes for Books.

And that’s all for today. I hope to get to reviews of some of my vacation reads tomorrow.

© 2008 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
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