News

This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Entries in Suzanne Collins (3)

Saturday
May302009

Saturday Night Visits: May 30

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I fell quite behind on my blog reading while I was on vacation last week. I spent some time catching up this weekend (though I was by no means able to actually read all of the posts that I missed), and I do have a few Kidlitosphere highlights for you today. I’ll be back Monday with some more literacy-focused news, both here and at Booklights.

Catching FirePeople have started receiving ARCs of the Hunger Games sequelCatching Fire (talk about an accurate title - this book is catching fire in the market already). PW has an article about it here. The first review that I saw (a positive one!) was from Tasha Saecker at Kids Lit. Sadly, I have not been among the lucky ARC recipients. But I am glad to hear that the book is being well-received. Really. And perhaps my copy is just slow making it out to California, don’t you think? Or, I should have gone to BEA.

Great news! Kelly Herold, of Big A little a and Cybils fame (and one of my very first blog friends), is back after a bit of a blogging hiatus. She’s started a new blog called Crossover. She explains: “This blog, Crossover, focuses on a rare breed of book—the adult book teens love, the teen book adults appreciate, and (very, very occasionally) that Middle Grade book adults read. I’m interested in reviewing books that transcend these age boundaries and understanding why these books are different.” I love Crossover books, and I’m certain to enjoy this new blot.

The Kidlitosphere’s own Greg Pincus from GottaBook has a new blog, too. It’s called The Happy Accident, and it’s about using social media to help create happy accidents. [If you need proof that Greg understands how to use blogs and other social media tools well, The Happy Accident already shows up as the #3 entry when I Google search.] Although this new blog is not about children’s literature, I’m introducing it here because I think that it will have value to anyone who has goals that in some way include using social media (Twitter, Facebook, blogs, etc.). I’ll certainly be following Greg’s progress.

And speaking of people from the Kidlitosphere doing great things, Betsy Bird and Liz Burns were both featured in a panel at BEA last week (with Libba Bray, Cheryl Klein, and Laura Lutz). School Library Journal has a mini recap of the session, written by Debra Lau Whelan. Debra begins: “When Betsy Bird and Liz Burns speak, people listen.” Certainly I always do. BEA also featured a blogger signing booth this year. Pam Coughlan and Sheila Ruth are scheduled to be there tomorrow, and Lenore was there earlier in the weekend. (And perhaps others - I’m too demoralized from not having been at BEA to read any more coverage.)

Betsy also recently received her first author copies of her upcoming book: Children’s Literature Gems, Choosing and Using Them in Your Library CareerShe has pictures here. And she was recently interviewed by James Preller.

CybilsLogoSmallAnd still speaking of Kidlitosphere members doing great things, the Cybils were included in a recent list of the Top 100 Poetry Blogs (along with several of our other friends). Sarah Stevenson has the full scoop, with links, at the Cybils blog.

The Book WhispererEsme Raji Codell recently reviewed Donalyn Miller’s The Book Whisperer last week at PlanetEsme. She begins with: “I don’t usually stray from reviews and recommendations of books for kids, but in the interest of children’s literacy I need to shout out about a title that might do for independent reading what Jim Trelease’s READ-ALOUD HANDBOOK did for read-aloud.” She moves on from there to compare and contrast Donalyn’s results with her own teaching experience, concluding on a positive note with “Oh, Donalyn Miller. You go, girl.”

At Jenny’s Wonderland of BooksJenny Schwartzberg traces a history of ghosts in children’s literature, from the 1600s through the 1960s (I remember Ghosts Who Went to School, too) right up to 2008 Newbery winner The Graveyard Book. She concludes: “Over the last two hundred years children’s books have shifted from showing ghosts as frightening images used to teach morals to ghosts as a common theme in all kinds of books for children, whether they be scary or friendly.” Like many of Jenny’s posts, this one is well-researched, and well worth checking out.

I recently discovered the blog YAnnabeKelly has a fun post called 5 Ways You Can Convert YA Scoffers, about methods for getting other adults to start reading young adult books. She begins: “We all know adults who read YA have nothing to be ashamed of. But I’m not content to read YA just for my happy little self. You see, I’m a pusher.” In addition to Kelly’s five tips, there are other reader-suggested ideas in the comments.

At the Reading Rockets Sound It Out blogJoanne Meier shares several “relatively painless ways for teachers to stay in touch with teaching and learning this summer, besides of course browsing Reading Rockets!” I was honored to be included (along with Anastasia Suen) on Joanne’s recommended resource list.

One_lovely_blog_awardSpeaking on honors, Mrs. V awarded me a One Lovely Blog award at Mrs. V’s Reviews, for new blogs and blogging friends. She agrees with my mission statement, about how “helping establish life long readers has the power to change the world.” It’s always a joy to find a new kindred spirit.

And that’s it! After resorting eventually to “mark all as read” in my reader, I’m declaring myself caught up. Happy weekend to all!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Thursday
May072009

Thursday Afternoon Visits: May 7

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

A few interesting things have crossed my reader this week from around the Kidlitosphere.

Babe RuthFirst up, I won a prize at Get in the Game—Read. I hardly ever enter contests for books because, you know, I feel guilty enough about the books that I already have that I’m not reading. But this one, I couldn’t resist. Lori Calabrese was giving away a signed copy of David A. Kelly’s Babe Ruth and the Baseball Curse. Here’s a snippet from the product description: “Then, in 2004, along came a scruffy, scrappy Red Sox team. Could they break Babe Ruth’s curse and win it all?” What can I say? I’m a woman of limited interests. (If it wasn’t for books, chocolate, the Pride and Prejudice miniseries, and the Red Sox, I’d be hard pressed to ever come up with Facebook status updates.)

Diary of a Wimpy Kid author Jeff Kinney was named to the Time 100 this year. Travis has the details at 100 Scope Notes. I love seeing a children’s book author recognized for his positive impact on kids. Also available at 100 Scope Notes this week, photographic proof of Where the Sidewalk Ends. I knew it had to be somewhere.

2009-CBW-PosterChildren’s Book Week will be observed May 11-17. Elaine Magliaro has tons of great links at Wild Rose Reader. Elaine also has a comprehensive round-up of National Poetry Month links from around the Kidlitosphere. I don’t know where she finds the time, I really don’t!

For anyone looking for summer reading recommendations for kids, do check out Claire’s summer reading list at The Horn Book website. There are some great titles, all nicely organized by age range. Link via Read Roger.

I learned via Omnivoracious that one of my favorite 2009 titles is already on the way to becoming a movie. “Film rights have for Carrie Ryan’s YA novel The Forest of Hands and Teeth have been snapped up by Seven Star Pictures. Publishers Weekly is reporting that “the project [is] for an-as-yet-unnamed A-list starlet.”” Now that has the potential to be a great movie!

Catching FireAnd speaking of my favorite dystopian YA novels, kudos to Lois Lowry for selecting Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games as the winner of SLJ’s Battle of the (Kids’) Books. For responses, see Liz B.’s take at A Chair, A Fireplace and A Tea Cozy or Maureen Kearney’s at Confessions of a Bibliovore. Color me envious of all those attending BEA, who may be able too score advance copies of the Hunger Games sequel, Catching Fire. (I’m also envying Sarah Miller, who seems to have herself a copy of Kristin Cashore’s Graceling prequel, Fire. One would think that I didn’t have hundreds of other books to choose from already. And don’t you think that Carrie Ryan’s next book should be called Unconsecrated Fire?).

Speaking of Kristin Cashore, she has an interesting post about intertextuality (when later books are influenced by earlier books, and then re-readings of the earlier books are influenced by your experience reading the later books).

Colleen Mondor comments on a trend that she’s noticed, of having 12-year-old protagonists in books published for adults. She says: “I”m not saying that adults can’t enjoy a book with a child protagonist - we all know and love Tom Sawyer and Scout and all those other classics that have stood the test of time and that’s great. But this whole teen trend thing that seemed such a big deal with Special Topics in Calamity Physics is starting to look like vamp novels look in YA. In other words these preternaturally smart children are starting to crop up everywhere and I wish I knew why.”

And last but not least, don’t miss MotherReader’s latest post at Booklights, about her favorite funny chapter books.

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Thursday
Jan222009

Thursday Afternoon Visits: January 22, part 1

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Lots going on around the Kidlitosphere this week. Here are a few highlights:

This just in! Publisher’s Weekly has a first look at the cover of the second Hunger Games book, by Suzanne Collins. Oh, how I’m dying for that book! The article says that: “Fans in the book industry can have their first chance to find out those surprises at the end of May—Scholastic will be giving out ARCs of Catching Fire at BEA in New York City.” Alas, I don’t plan to be at BEA. But I’m hoping that I’ll wrangle a copy at some point… P.S. Lenore posted the cover, too. I’m a bit leery of posting it before Amazon does, so I’ll send you to Lenore or PW.  

ReadKiddoLogoPW also has an article by Judith Rosen about James Patterson’s new ReadKiddoRead initiative. I haven’t had a chance to check this out myself, but I’ve been hearing good feedback so far. And you have to love the site’s tagline: “Dedicated to making you kids readers for life.” The PW article says: “By December, with almost no fanfare except for a mention in an interview with Al Roker and an ad in Peoplemagazine, the site attracted 20,000 visitors. It brings together reviews for books for newborns to teens, interviews with bestselling children’s authors like Jeff Kinney and Rick Riordan, and a book blog with reading lists by children’s literature consultant Judy Freeman, author of Books Kids Will Sit Still For.” I signed up for the mailing list, and will keep an eye on the whole thing.

And, as reported by Betsy Bird at Fuse #8, the 2008 Cuffies have been announced. These are a series of children’s book awards, some in unusual categories, derived from input by retailers. I always find them entertaining, and this year is no exception. You get things like “book with best plot twist” and “book you wish everyone would shut up about”.

Ranger's ApprenticeIn honor of next summer’s publication of the sixth book in the Ranger’s Apprentice series, Penguin is making the first book in the series, The Ruins of Gorlan, available as a free eBook. The site went live last week, and will be available until February 15th. Click here to view the book. As with the recent promotion for Readicide, I spend far too much time online already to be personally excited about a reading a whole book that way. But, I still think that promotions like this are a great way to generate excitement about books. 

Assimilating input from various children’s literature fans, Jenny Schwartzberg from Jenny’s Wonderland of Books has put together a tremendous list of Middle Grade Historical Fiction set in Asia. She also includes extensive notes on the compilation of the list, and the input that she received. This is an amazing new resource for fans of historical fiction and people looking for books set in Asia.

Kirby Larson has an interesting post today about writers and their “fingerprints”. Not literal fingerprints, but writing fingerprints, some signature attribute of an author’s writing that “marks your work as uniquely yours.” Although I’m not an author, of course, Kirby actually made me think about a strength that I display in my regular job, and how that might translate to children’s books and literacy.

I have a bunch of other things flagged, but I don’t have time to write them up write now. So I’ll leave you with these, and be back later with the rest. Stay tuned…

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).